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United States. Army. Ohio Infantry Regiment, 21st - MS 562

Abstracts: Part 2--Box 12

Box 12

Folder 1

  1. Cong. Josiah Given, Washington, D.C., January 6, 1866
    Response to letter from McMahan requesting assistance in getting a place in the Army; Given describes application procedure; Suggests McMahan contact his representative, Senator John Sherman, since each representative is permitted to name one applicant; Given will speak on McMahan's behalf since they served together.
  2. Josiah Given, Washington, D.C., March 8, 1866
    Given informs McMahan of the state of his application; Has spoken to Cong. James Ashley and assures McMahan of Ashley's attentiveness; No action can be taken until the Military Bill, increasing the size of the Army passes.
  3. Cong. James Ashley, Washington, D.C., March 19, 1866
    Reports on the status of McMahan's application; Little chance of McMahan getting any position, excepting 2nd Lieutenant; Position is so poorly paid that Ashley did not apply for such a position for McMahan; Only chance of getting a post office job in East Toledo is if one becomes available.
  4. Cong. James Ashley, Washington, D.C., May 12, 1866
    Has not responded to McMahan's letters due to illness; Is going to visit his family and will see McMahan in East Toledo and contact mutual friends to see if a post office position can be obtained for McMahan.
  5. Cong. James Ashley, Washington, D.C., May 31, 1866
    Ashley denies McMahan's charge that he was simply finding an easy way to say no to McMahan's request for a post office job because he has decided to favor someone else; Says McMahan must be patient until Ashley visits Toledo.
  6. (Arnold McMahan), East Toledo, OH, n.d.
    Draft of a petition addressed to William Dennison, Postmaster General requesting the current East Toledo Postmaster be replaced by McMahan since the man holding the office is not a veteran and McMahan is; McMahan will also move the post office to a brick building.

Folder 2

  1. G.E. Dolton, St. Louis, MO, January 25, 1890
    Response to McMahan's letter of January 22, (Box 12, Folder 11, Item 1); Dolton (in the 1st Illinois during the War) recounts his private research on the Battle of Chickamauga, including his survey of the battlefield with a transit; Recounts his attempts to reconcile conflicting accounts and create a map showing the battle's movements; Commends McMahan on the detail of his letter, but questions how his regiment could have been captured so quietly; Evinces great interest in correct placement of proposed battlefield monuments.
  2. G.E. Dolton, St. Louis, MO, February 3, 1890
    Response to McMahan's letter of January 30, 1890 (Draft--Box 12, Folder 5, Item 1 and handwritten copy--Box 12, Folder 11, Item 2); Expresses sympathy for McMahan's physical condition; Denies any bias; Asserts wish to discover troop movements and their relations to each other; Recounts his interviews with General Fullerton, General Boynton, Colonel A.R. Robinson, and a Mr. Gill of the 121st Ohio; States various accounts of troop movements.
  3. G.E. Dolton, St. Louis, MO, February 8, 1890
    Response to McMahan's letter of February 6, 1890 (Box 12, Folder 11, Item 3); States his dissatisfaction with recently obtained War Department maps of the Battle of Chickamauga and details his objections; Recounts testimony by J.S. Gill (Delaware, OH, formerly of the 121st Ohio) gained by walking over the battlefield with him and finding physical landmarks; Describes the chronology and other records he kept during the battle and throughout the War; Ends by pointing out the evidence still available on the battlefield.
  4. G.E. Dolton, St. Louis, MO March 26, 1890
    Expresses sympathy for McMahan's ill health; States dissatisfaction with the War Department maps he has received; Has been told the maps were designed so the monuments would be placed to give the greatest credit to certain regiments; Plans to get his evidence in incontestable form and challenge official accounts; Trying to confirm an assurance that General Rosecrans left the field of battle.
  5. G.E. Dolton, St. Louis, MO, April 2, 1890
    Thanks McMahan for maps showing the positions of the 21st Ohio on September 20, 1863; Encloses a War Department map on which McMahan should mark the positions and movements of his regiment on each day of the battle.
  6. G.E. Dolton, St. Louis, MO, April 4, 1890
    Enthusiastically thanks McMahan for his "further memorandum" of the battle since it has helped him confirm his own position and challenge the official accounts.
  7. G.E. Dolton, St. Louis, MO, April 8, 1890
    Comments on letter McMahan enclosed when returning the War Department maps Excited at the extent to which McMahan's recollections corroborate his own; Comments further on the inaccuracies of the War Department maps; Disagrees with statements made in a letter by Judge G.S. Robinson, a copy of which he received from McMahan.
  8. G.E. Dolton, St. Louis, MO, April 14, 1890
    Acknowledges receipt of map from McMahan showing positions of the 21st; Notes receipt of twenty-one page explanation of how the War Department maps were prepared from official reports; Says proper way would have been to have a meeting of survivors on the battlefield first, and then draw upon official reports; Poses questions about "La Favour" (sic); Evidence beginning to reveal how mistake was made about position of Mitchell's troops; Hopes to find two trees mentioned by McMahan since these will help establish the position of the 22nd Michigan and 35th and 89th Ohio; Asks some questions about incidents described in McMahan's account; Quotes extensively from accounts by G.S. Robinson and J.B. Nall (?) that seem to describe the same incident, but differ as they relate to the 21st, prompting him to ask further questions of McMahan.
  9. G.E. Dolton, St. Louis, MO, April 19, 1890
    Brief letter thanking McMahan for sending a copy of a statement he had received from Col. Carlton that speaks of the hurried movement of a battery to the rear; Dolton speculates on the identity of the battery; Extends sympathy on McMahan's illness.

Folder 3

  1. G.E. Dolton, St. Louis, MO, May 5, 1890
    Pledges to take McMahan's place in locating the positions of the 21st at the upcoming reunion; Encourages McMahan to try to recall further landmarks, even if apparently minor; Discusses the location of various landmarks on the battle site including trees, remains of breastworks, a ravine, a creek, and a tanyard; Mentions recently published battle accounts; Discusses a discrepancy in accounts of the location of the 89th and 98th Ohio brought to light by a letter received from the Rev. D.C. Milner, adjutant of the 98th.
  2. G.E. Dolton, St. Louis, May 15, 1890
    Thanks McMahan for sending a portion of a letter he received from Lt. Killus (?) specifying troop positions; Sympathizes with McMahan over his health; Speaks of how discovery of letters written at the time of the battle are causing men to revise their memories; Records how a mistaken account of the capture of the 22nd Michigan has become authoritative through its publication; Its writer admitted to Dolton that he had not attempted to check the account.
  3. G.E. Dolton, St. Louis, May 17, 1890
    Proclaims lack of bias and singlemindedness in searching for truth; Comments on physical landmarks McMahan mentions in his account of the 21st's movements; Discusses how the official accounts of the battle were written based on hearsay, rather than physical evidence; Contends that the official reports of General Rosecrans, General Boynton, and General Brannan are each dubious since they were based on unconfirmed accounts by subordinates.
  4. G.E. Dolton, St. Louis, May 27, 1890
    Reports on his recent trip to the battlefield in the company of Major Cusac, who retraced the 21st's movements; Dolton found the trees, remains of breastworks, and other details McMahan had described; Recounts surveying the battlefield in the company of Colonel McSpadden of Deas' Brigade and the way this confirmed information and provided new details; Mentions a correction that will be made in Union Reports of Chickamauga based on evidence he has submitted; In a lengthy postscript discusses the attempt others are making to keep the official history in place, and provides a more detailed account of what was said during the meeting at the battle site; Raises questions about the number of men captured; Expresses satisfaction with the incontrovertibility of the physical evidence he found to confirm his account of the battle.
  5. G.E. Dolton, St. Louis, May 28, 1890
    Reports the location of the trees McMahan mentioned, providing distances; Prompts McMahan to send more information about what he witnessed; Urges return of a Cincinnati Gazette article he had sent to McMahan.
  6. G.E. Dolton, St. Louis, June 6, 1890
    Thanks McMahan for sending a copy of a letter by General Boynton and a photograph of the map that accompanied it; Analyzes the map's errors in great detail, providing the proof he has for his views; Evinces astonishment that one ostensibly in command during the battle could have gotten the position of the troops so wrong; Analyzes Boynton's letter in detail, providing a great deal of information about the battle; Responds to McMahan's comments on the Boynton letter; Refers to inadvertently revealing information he received through conversations and letters that may indicate key commanders were not on the battlefield; Comments on difficulty of determining the time of events from those involved because they often had no watch or did not consult them; Recounts description of battle site marker placement received from a witness; Questions points in McMahan's account that appear weak because of the physical evidence and the lack of corroborating reports.

Folder 4

  1. G.E. Dolton, St. Louis, June 14, 1890
    Discusses the efforts of an unnamed group to take control of the battle site, maintain the official accounts of the battle, and, probably, prevent him from making further surveys; Comments on difficulty of getting his version of the battle in the press; Notes receiving a letter from a staff officer that inadvertently clarifies three separate points; Contrasts his own careful research with people who publish mere theories--their own and others; Anticipates increasing difficulty in investigations because people will refuse to give him information; Notes acceptance of his statements about his regiment by the War Department; Takes further exception to General Boynton's statements.
  2. G.E. Dolton, St. Louis, June 16, 1890 (map attached)
    Commiserates with McMahan's dissatisfaction with official investigation; Responds to questions raised by McMahan about his account; Records difficulties in getting information from participants, even at the battle site, because of their reliance on other people's accounts, instead of their recollections; Encloses a map of the location and movements of the regiments around the 21st and explains it in detail in the body of his letter; Attempts to show that his interpretation of events resolves clashes in testimony.
  3. G.E. Dolton, St. Louis, June 19, 1890
    Recounts contents of a letter he received recording General Negley's movements that also refers to the actions of the 21st; Specifies how he thinks he will be prevented from doing more field research once the battle field becomes a monument; Describes his analysis of the original accounts of the battle to see if there is evidence of tampering; Comments on McMahan's suggestion that he be attached to the official investigation of the battle, by saying that such a position would make his work easier but refuses to seek a position himself.
  4. G.E. Dolton, St. Louis, June 24, 1890
    Expresses great interest in a Toledo Blade article by Colonel Moe described by McMahan; Stresses the confidentiality of all he has written to McMahan since he wishes to maintain good relations with everyone to get as much information as possible; Responds to McMahan's query about his military career, primarily describing the private records he kept of the activities of the battery he commanded; Emphasizes that his concern is with getting an accurate account and not with advancing himself.
  5. G.E. Dolton, St. Louis, July 7, 1890
    Reports on his recent trip to the battle site in the company of former Confederates; Describes proliferation of markers establishing the positions of various regiments; Expresses surprise at how mistaken some of them are; Includes a copy of a map made by General Boynton.
  6. G.E. Dolton, St. Louis, July 11, 1890
    Notes receiving extracts from articles about Chickamauga from McMahan; Reports on additional information gathered about Negley; Addresses questions raised by new information concerning troop movements around the 21st.
  7. G.E. Dolton, St. Louis, October 25, 1890
    Apologizes for not returning sent by McMahan sooner; Records new information he has received about the movements of the 18th Ohio Battery and the 40th Ohio; Notes plan to return the sword of Colonel Hammond he recovered from a Confederate officer; Recounts the activities of the Park Commissioners.

Folder 5

  1. Arnold McMahan, Toledo, OH, January 30, 1890 (map attached)
    Response to G.E. Dolton's letter of January 25, 1890 (two drafts of this letter exist--Box 12, Folder 2, Item 1 and Box 12, Folder 11, Item 2); Appreciates Dolton's account of Chickamauga since it answers some questions that long puzzled McMahan; Notes incorrectness of published accounts about the activity and capture of the 22nd Michigan, and the 89th and 21st Ohio; Asserts origin of mistakes; Spurred by Dolton's reference to the 21st's quiet capture, provides his own account; Includes map.

Folder 6

  1. Sanford C. Kellogg,Brevet Lt. Col., War Department, Washington, DC, November 22, 1888 (handwritten copy attached)
    Acknowledges receipt of letter and papers sent by McMahan concerning the activities of the 21st Ohio at Chickamauga; States the information was confirmed by a visit to the battle site; Pledges to place the 21st properly on maps he is preparing.
  2. C.M. Keeves, Asst. Adj. Gen'l, War Department, Washington, D.C., >May 8, 1889
    Acknowledges receipt of a letter by McMahan concerning the application of Homer Jones (Sheridan, MI, formerly of Co. C, 21st O.V.I.) application for removal of the desertion charge against him; Encloses printed copy of the law related to desertion; States that charge will be removed because of change in the law.
  3. Sanford C. Kellogg,War Department Washington, D.C., June 21, 1889
    States only proof copies of his maps are available; Notes the maps' basis in official reports, survivors' accounts, visits to the site, and Kellogg's own recollection; Encourages McMahan to attend upcoming meeting of the Army of the Cumberland at Chattanooga; A visit to the battle site will be made and Kellogg could resolve any questions McMahan has.
  4. M. Sheridan, Asst. Adj. General, Washington, D.C., June 24, 1889
    Responds to a letter from McMahan dated June 19, concerning a report prepared by McMahan in 1864 presenting the movements of the 21st Ohio at Chickamauga (Box 12, folder 10, Item 3); States that this report is not on file, although one by Charles Vantine is; The report by McMahan will be "received and published" if properly authenticated.
  5. Arnold McMahan, Toledo, OH, June 29, 1889 (handwritten copy)
    Letter to the United States Adjutant General's office; Notes enclosure of his report on the role of the 21st O.V.I. at Chickamauga; Lists other reports he sent to the War Department during the War that may now be missing and his willingness to provide authentic copies if they are not on file.
  6. J.C. Kelton, Adj. General, Washington, D.C., July 2, 1889
    Acknowledges receipt of McMahan's report on Chickamauga; Notes all other reports made by McMahan during the War are on file with the exception of that War Department concerning the battle of Vining Station, GA, a copy of which will be appreciated.
  7. J.C. Kelton, Adj. General, War Dept., Washington, D.C., July 11, 1889
    Acknowledges receipt of an authenticated copy of McMahan's report on the battle at Vining Station, GA.
  8. George B. Davis, War Records Office, Washington, D.C., December 21, 1889
    Notes sending a copy of "Parts I and II of the Chickamauga volumes"; Final volume to be ready June 30, 1890.
  9. Cong. William Haynes, Fremont, OH, December 28, 1889
    Has had a preliminary copy of the history history of the battle of Chickamauga to McMahan and will have a final copy sent when available; Encourages McMahan to notify him of any errors and he will pass them on to the volumes' compiler, George Davis.
  10. Arnold McMahan, Toledo, OH, January 1, 1890 (handwritten copy)
    Letter to Major George B. Davis, War Records Office; Questions Captain Vantine's report of Chickamauga since in it the 22nd Michigan and 89th Ohio are confused with General J.M. Brannan's Division of Major General George F. Thomas' Corps.
  11. George B. Davis, War Records Office, Washington, D.C., January 4, 1890
    Acknowledges McMahan's criticisms of the Vantine report but notes that the reports must be published as submitted; McMahan's letter will be filed with the report.
  12. Arnold McMahan, Toledo, OH, February 6, 1890 (draft)
    Letter to Colonel S.C. Kellogg, War Department; Acknowledges receipt of maps prepared by Kellogg and notes errors; States he realizes no attention will be paid to his comments.
  13. Arnold McMahan, Toledo, OH, February 6, 1890 (draft)
    Letter to Colonel S.C. Kellogg, War Department; Acknowledges receipt of maps prepared by Kellogg and notes errors (as attached circular requests) about position of Gracie and Kelley's rebel brigades and in map legends; States that he assumes no attention will be paid to his comments.
  14. Redfield Proctor, Secretary of War, Washington, D.C., May 13, 1890
    Responds to McMahan's comments (Box 12, Folder 11, Item 5) on Kellogg's maps by quoting statements made by Kellogg concerning the sources used to create them; Other quotes from Kellogg acknowledge the conflicting views on the position of regiments on the site, contend that such differences will "probably never be reconciled," and claim that the "weight of evidence is against McMahan."
  15. Arnold McMahan, Toledo, OH May 17, 1890 (draft fragment)
    Acknowledges receipt of Proctor's letter (Complete draft--Box 12, Folder 11, Item 5).
  16. Arnold McMahan, n.d.(draft fragment)
    Analyzes positions of the 22nd Michigan and 89th Ohio and the way they should be presented on addressee's map (probably Dolton).

Folder 7

FOLDER 7 INCLUDES CASUALTY LISTS (SOME WITH REVISIONS--17 LEAVES).

  1. Arnold McMahan, Toledo, OH, July 2, 1889 (handwritten copy)
    Letter to Comstock requesting him to look over enclosed casualty lists for the 21st at Chickamauga and note any errors; States interest is related to need for accuracy if 21st's role in the battle is ever to be written up.
  2. Arnold McMahan, Toledo, OH, July 9, 1889 (handwritten copy)
    Letter to Captain Isaac Cusac requesting him to make any changes necessary to the 21st's casualty lists for Chickamauga; Notes a plan to write an account of the 21st's part in the battle.
  3. H.J. Henry, Hicksville, OH, July 20, 1889
    Responds to McMahan's letter concerning casualties by noting the capture of the McConkey brothers at Chickamauga, their later confinement at Andersonville, and their current residence.
  4. J.L. Keller, Jenera, OH, September 16, 1889
    Responds to McMahan's request for information about casualties; Makes additions to casualties list for Company A and provides list of casualties for Company F.

Folder 8

  1. Gov. J.B. Foraker, Columbus, OH, July 5, 1889
    Responds to McMahan's complaints about the printed Roster of the 21st O.V.I. by referring him to General Axline, supervisor of its printing.
  2. John N. Chapin, Chief Clerk, Adj. General's Office, Columbus, OH, July 6, 1889
    Responds to some of the specific errors pointed out by McMahan; Discusses the difficulties of compiling the Roster; Encourages McMahan to visit the office for a fuller explanation.
  3. J.W. Knox, Chief Clerk, Adj. General's Office, Columbus, OH, July 10, 1889
    Responds to McMahan's letter to General Axline concerning errors in Roster; Corrections will be printed in an errata.

Folder 9

  1. Arnold McMahan, Camp Chase, OH, April 12, 1864 (draft)
    Letter to General J.S. Negley; Responding to a letter from Negley, pledges to submit a report on the 21st at Chickamauga as soon as he can get further information; Relates his imprisonment; Asserts that it is difficult to believe that Negley was remiss in his command at Chickamauga.
  2. Arnold McMahan, Columbus, OH, April 13, 1864 (draft)
    Letter to Colonel William Sirwell, Commanding 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 14th A.C.; Requests a copy of Sirwell's report on Chickamauga or a statement that McMahan can attach to his report to confirm whether or not the 21st was under Sirwell's command on September 20, 1863 at Chickamauga.
  3. Maj. Gen'l J.S. Negley, Headquarters, Louisville, KY, April 18, 1864 (handwritten copy)
    Acknowledges McMahan's letter of April 12; Notes criticisms of himself by General Brannan and Wood and how he had them resolved in his favor by a court of inquiry; Asserts that the 21st was detached from his command and placed under the command of General Brannan on September 20, 1863; Encourages McMahan's investigations.
  4. Arnold McMahan, Perrysburg, OH, April 22, 1864 (draft)
    Letter to Colonel VanDerVeer; Notes imprisonment by the enemy; Is now filing his report on Chickamauga and requests a letter from VanDerVeer stating that he abandoned the 21st O.V.I. in the position he did after ordering it to expend all its ammunition.
  5. Arnold McMahan, Perrysburg, OH, April 22, 1864 (draft)
    Letter to Brigadier General Brannan; Excerpts April 18, 1864 letter from General Negley to show that the 21st O.V.I. was under Brannan's command on September 20, 1863; Notes that he is now writing his official report of Chickamauga after being released from a rebel prison and would like to attach a letter from Brannan in which Brannan explains why McMahan was not informed of the withdrawal of the troops around the 21st.
  6. Arnold McMahan, Perrysburg, OH, April 24, 1864 (draft)
    Letter to Major General B.F. Button, Commander for Exchange of Prisoners; Explains that he is a paroled prisoner and since ten officers of his regiment are still in prison, he wishes to be exchanged so that he can return to duty with his command in the field.
  7. Arnold McMahan, Perrysburg, OH, April 27, 1864 (draft)
    Letter to R.S. Mungen, 1st Lieutenant and Quartermaster, 21st O.V.I.; Notes that he is required to supply reports of stores for the 21st, the records for which were destroyed in the battle of Stones River January 1, 1863; Requests Mungen to send invoices of all ordnance and ordnance stores received between September 1, 1861 and December 31, 1862; Should Mungen's records have been destroyed McMahan asks that a certificate stating this be forwarded to him.
  8. Arnold McMahan, Perrysburg, OH, April 27, 1864 (draft)
    Letter to Lieutenant Daniel Lewis, A.A. Quartermaster, 21st O.V.I.; Notes destruction of his papers at the battle of Stones River and his need for invoices of all ordnance and ordnance stores received between September 1, 1861 and December 31, 1862 in order to file official reports; Asks Lewis to provide copies of these invoices, or, if the records have been destroyed, to forward a certificate stating this to McMahan.
  9. Brig. Gen'l Brannan, Headquarters, Department of the Cumberland, Chattanooga, TN, May 3, 1864
    Acknowledges McMahan's letter of April 22, 1864; States that none of his troops withdrew from the field before the 21st's capture and thus there was no reason to inform McMahan of the withdrawal of troops; Says that after he was informed of the 21st's "quiet capture" he moved the 35th to cover the position they had held; Refers to the statements made by General Negley about the 21st's covering his retreat as mistaken, since the 68th and 101st Indiana performed this function long after the 21st had been captured.
  10. Arnold McMahan, Camp Chase, OH, April 6, 1864 (draft)
    Report made to Brigadier General William D. Whipple, Assistant Attorney General of the United States; Details the 21st O.V.I.'s engagement at Chickamauga (September 19 and 20, 1863); Includes a tally of the wounded, captured and amount of ammunition expended.
  11. Arnold McMahan, Headquarters, 21st OVI, Near Atlanta, GA, July 14, 1864 (draft)
    Letter to General William D. Whipple, Assistant Attorney General of the United States; Notes enclosure of his report on the 21st's engagement at Chickamauga and the attachment of letters from Generals Negley and Brannan; Points out that Brannan refers to the quiet surrender of the 21st, but claims that Brannan may have been misinformed about the position of his troops, resulting in his mistaken account of the 21st's capture.
  12. Arnold McMahan, Headquarters, 21st OVI, Near Atlanta, GA, July 15, 1864
    Letter to General W.D. Whipple, Assistant Adjutant General; Requests permission to make his report of the conduct of the 21st at Chickamauga public, and the letter of transmittal accompanying it.
  13. Arnold McMahan, Headquarters, 21st OVI, Near Atlanta, GA, July 10, 1864 (draft)
    Letter to B.P. Denny(?), Acting Assistant Adjutant General; Reports on engagement against the enemy by the 21st on July 9; Recounts the details and presents tally of dead, wounded, missing, and prisoners captured.
  14. Arnold McMahan, Headquarters, 21st OVI, Near Atlanta, GA, September 9, 1864 (draft)
    Reports on the action of the 21st in the Georgia campaign through September 2, 1864; Provides basic details of engagements at Buzzard's Roost, Resaca, Bald Knob (Kenesaw Mountain), Vining Station, Jonesboro, and near Atlanta, among others; Gives tally of casualties; Commends Adjutant E.L. Baird and Sergeant Major Earl W. Werry (?).
  15. Arnold McMahan, Headquarters, 21st OVI, Near Atlanta, GA, September 9, 1864 (draft)
    General order in which McMahan commends his troops for their past action and exhorts them to continued discipline.
  16. Arnold McMahan, Headquarters, 21st OVI, Savannah, GA, December 30, 1864 (draft)
    Report to Lieutenant L.G. Badie, Acting Assistant Adjutant General on the action of the 21st between September 3 and December 21, 1864; Provides estimated distances marched, involvement in the fall of Savannah, sabotage achieved; Notes provisioning to the regiment from the countryside and capture of horses and mules.
  17. Arnold McMahan, Headquarters, 21st OVI, Near Atlanta, GA, September 16, 1864 (draft)
    Letter to Assistant Adjutant General Robert H. Ramsey; Notes that in compliance with orders he is sending two swords taken from the enemy; Provides details of the swords' capture.
  18. Arnold McMahan, Headquarters, 21st OVI, Sister's Ferry, GA, February 4, 1865 (draft)
    Letter of recommendation to the Honorable John Brough, Governor of Ohio, on behalf of Captain George F. Walker; McMahan states Walker is well-qualified to be commander of one of the new Ohio regiments that are to be formed.
  19. Arnold McMahan, Headquarters, 21st OVI, Near Atlanta, GA, January 27, 1865 (draft)
    Letter to the Honorable James M. Ashley, Washington, D.C. requesting a promotion to Brevet Brigadier General; Notes that the depleted size of his regiment and doubtfulness of reinforcement makes it impossible for him to be mustered as colonel; Recalls his War record and refers Ashley to the battle reports on file; Points out that his regiment voted unanimously for Ashley in the last election.
  20. Arnold McMahan, Headquarters, 3rd Brig., 1st Division, 14th AC, Near Goldsboro, NC, March 22, 1865 (draft)
    Report to Captain J.E. Edmonds, Acting Assistant Adjutant General for the period January 20 to March 23, 1865; Notes assumption of command of the 3rd Brigade on January 20 upon the severe wounding of the previous commander, Lieutenant Colonel D. Miles, 79th Regiment of Pennsylvania; Summarizes marches and distances; Notes destruction of railroad lines, construction of corduroy road, and the value of "subsistence supplies drawn from the country"; Presents tally of prisoners captured, killed, wounded and captured.
  21. Arnold McMahan, Headquarters, 3rd Brig., 1st Division, 14th AC, Near Goldsboro, NC, March 26, 1865 (draft)
    Letter to the Honorable John Brough, Governor of Ohio; Reminds Brough that he is now in command of the 21st due to the resignation of Colonel James N. Neibling; Notes expectation that he would be commissioned as a Colonel upon Neibling's resignation and hopes that this will occur.
  22. Arnold McMahan, Headquarters, 3rd Brig., 1st Division, 14th AC, Near Goldsboro, NC, March 20, 1865 (draft)
    Letter of recommendation on behalf of Captain David H. Patton (?) to Adjutant General of Indiana; Recommends Patton as well-qualified to command a regiment and offers an account of his performance in battle on March 19.
  23. Arnold McMahan, Headquarters, 3rd Brig., 1st Division, 14th AC, In the field, NC, April 24, 1865(draft)
    Letter to the Minister of the Republic of Mexico; Notes that the regiment he commands will soon be disbanded and offers his services as a soldier to the Republic of Mexico.
  24. H.A. Hombright ?),Brevet Brig. General, Lancaster, PA, August 9, 1865 (handwritten copy)
    Notes receipt of a letter from McMahan; States that a letter recommending McMahan for promotion in the regular army has been sent and that McMahan should make his "claims to the Department" now.
  25. Arnold McMahan, Perrysburg, OH, August 18, 1865 (draft)
    Letter to the Honorable Edward M. Stanton, Secretary of War; Requests an appointment as an officer in the regular army; Briefly summarizes War record and refers Stanton to letters of recommendation submitted to the War Department and to the official reports McMahan submitted during the War.
  26. Arnold McMahan, East Toledo, OH, December 9, 1865 (draft)
    Letter to the Honorable James M. Ashley, Washington, D.C.; Notes Ashley's response to his previous request; Indicates why he thinks he is justified in approaching Ashley again; Asks for Ashley's support in having an appointment as Brevet Colonel of Volunteers confirmed or in getting an appointment in the regular army.
  27. Arnold McMahan, Perrysburg, OH, August 18, 1865 (draft)
    Letter to Major General George H. Thomas accompanying an application for appointment to the regular army that McMahan wants Thomas to submit to the Secretary of War for him; Notes that Lieutenant Colonel A. Von Schrader will provide a letter of introduction to Thomas.
  28. Major A. Von Schrader, Nashville, TN, September 12, 1865 (handwritten copy)
    Remarks made by Major A. Von Schrader to Major General Thomas on McMahan's application for an appointment to the regular army; Summarizes McMahan's War record and establishes basis for recommending him.
  29. Major General H. Thomas Nashville, TN September 14, 1865 (handwritten copy)
    Letter to the Secretary of War forwarding McMahan's application for an appointment in the regular army with his recommendation.
  30. W.H. Sidell and A. Von Schrader, Nashville, TN, November 19, 1862 (handwritten copy)
    Order complimenting 21st O.V.I. under the command of Lieutenant Von Schrader with an appended commendation of McMahan by A. Von Schrader.
  31. Arnold McMahan, East Toledo, OH, December 27, 1865 (draft)
    Letter to the Honorable James M. Ashley noting enclosure of recommendations of his application for appointment to the regular army and location of further recommendations.
  32. Arnold McMahan, East Toledo, OH, February 16, 1866 (draft)
    Letter to the Honorable James M. Ashley requesting acknowledgment of his letter of December 27, 1865; Notes that if it is unlikely that he will get an army appointment he would like to become postmaster of East Toledo; Refers to the fact that he is currently operating a mercantile business.
  33. Arnold McMahan, East Toledo, OH, March 6, 1866 (draft)
    Letter to the Honorable H.L. Wood summarizing efforts to get an appointment in the regular army and requesting Wood to assist him by securing recommendations on McMahan's behalf from all the representatives to the general assembly from the district; Notes imminent passage of a military bill by Congress.
  34. Arnold McMahan, East Toledo, OH, March 23, 1866 (draft)
    Letter to James Roymer, Postmaster of East Toledo, OH; Announces his intention to apply for appointment as postmaster of East Toledo; Asserts his belief that this position is his due; Assures Roymer of his "personal good will."
  35. Arnold McMahan, East Toledo, OH, March 30, 1866 (draft)
    Letter to James Roymer, Member of the Union Central Committee; Regrets that he cannot accept the position of trustee offered him.
  36. Arnold McMahan, East Toledo, OH, March 31, 1866 (draft)
    Letter to the Honorable James M. Ashley concerning McMahan's wish to be appointed postmaster of East Toledo; Claims that the current postmaster, Roymer, is about to resign in favor of a friend in order to continue to benefit from the position; Mentions a petition supporting him for the position.
  37. Joseph Hindon, East Toledo, OH, March 31, 1866 (handwritten copy)
    Letter to William Dennison, Postmaster General, Washington, D.C.; States that friends are trying to get the position of postmaster of East Toledo for him and asks Dennison to refuse their request; Claims he does not want to offend his friends by telling them not to make the request; Feels he has not been a resident of East Toledo long enough to quality him for the position.
  38. Arnold McMahan, East Toledo, OH, April 2, 1866 (draft)
    Letter to the Honorable James M. Ashley accompanying a petition signed by local residents requesting that McMahan be made postmaster of East Toledo; Notes attempt of Roymer, the current postmaster, to resign in favor of one of his friends; Refers to enclosure of a copy of a letter by Roymer's candidate refusing to accept the position; McMahan states Roymer's actions have forced him to send his petition without circulating it as long as he would like; Note says petition contained 118 names and on May 16 one containing 41 names was sent.
  39. Arnold McMahan, East Toledo, OH, May 28, 1866 (draft)
    Letter to the Honorable James M. Ashley; Acknowledges a letter from Ashley stating he will make no decision about the position of postmaster until he visits East Toledo, which he expects to do soon; McMahan says he interprets this to mean he will not get the appointment; Has decided it is not worth it to "harass" anyone about the position any more; Requests return of papers he sent Ashley and notes it is not good to give up old friends for new.
  40. Arnold McMahan, East Toledo, OH, November 15, 1866 (draft)
    Note to L.C. Morse, Esq., stating he will be unable to take the land he had discussed with Morse since he cannot collect money due to him.
  41. Arnold McMahan, East Toledo, OH, June 20, 1889 (draft)
    Letter to General Ferdinand VanDerVeer, Hamilton, Butler County, Ohio, noting enclosure of a copy of a letter sent to VanDerVeer April 22, 1864; Claims he never received an answer to his initial letter, suggesting that it may have never reached VanDerVeer, and hopes that he will now.

Folder 10

  1. Arnold McMahan, [June 10, 1889](draft)
    Letter to [H.H. Alban] accompanying an article by Lieutenant Vance on Chickamauga; Gives credit to Alban for a change in position that Vance regards as tactically impressive.
  2. Arnold McMahan, n.d. (draft)
    Response to a letter from S.S. Canfield providing additional information about Chickamauga; Recognizes Canfield's important role in the battle; Notes that his health might prevent him from publishing an accurate account of the battle.
  3. Arnold McMahan,[June 19, 1889](draft)
    Letter to the Adjutant General of the Army, Washington, D.C.; Notes published request for missing War reports; Summarizes his role at Chickamauga and notes a report of the battle he wrote that may not have been received by the War Department; Offers to send the report with additional information appended.
  4. Arnold McMahan, June 20, 1889 (draft)
    Letter to General Ferdinand VanDerVeer, Hamilton, OH, accompanying a copy of a letter by McMahan to VanDerVeer written in 1864 (Box 12, Folder 9, Item 4); Notes sending the letter in 1864 and never getting a response; Suggests the letter went astray and now that VanDerVeer has received it should respond to it; (A handwritten copy of this letter is in Box 12, Folder 9, Item 41).
  5. Arnold McMahan, n.d. (Notes)
    Notes for a letter to General VanDerVeer; Acknowledges that at the time he wrote his letter of April 22, 1864 he was under the false impression that the 22nd Michigan and 89th Ohio were under VanDerVeer's command at Chickamauga; Believes the substance of his 1864 letter is unaffected by this mistake.
  6. Arnold McMahan, n.d. (Notes)
    Entitled "Comments on General Brannan's Letter of May 3rd, 1864"; Notes confusion of Brannan on the location of troops at Chickamauga; Refers to his own recollections and an article by General Boynton as evidence; Under the heading "The Regiment" describes the size, composition, arms, and condition of the [21st]; Under "Losses" notes two deaths and loss of horses and equipment; Under "The effect of moving to the right" describes the results on the 21st, 89th Ohio, and 22nd Michigan on the order to move to the right.
  7. Arnold McMahan, (June 29), 1889 (draft)
    Letter to the Adjutant General of the United States, Washington, D.C. (a handwritten copy--Box 12, Folder 6, Item 5); Refers to past correspondence on missing War reports; Lists other reports he wrote and offers to send copies of any that are not on file; (For the response to this letter see Box 12, Folder 6, Item 6).
  8. Arnold McMahan, Toledo, Ohio, July 22, 1889 (draft)
    Letter to Colonel C.H. Carlton; Notes his imprisonment with Carlton in Libby Prison; Refers to his recent submission of his report on Chickamauga to the War Department in response to the Department's call for missing War records; States that no report on Carlton's regiment, the 89th Ohio, has been filed; Provides a list of questions about the battle he wants Carlton to answer.
  9. Arnold McMahan, Toledo, Ohio, July 24, 1889 (draft)
    Letter to General H.V. Boynton, Washington, D.C.; Refers to an article by Boynton in the Cincinnati Commercial Gazette; McMahan notes his understanding that Colonel VanDerVeer had given him the order to charge but acknowledges that Colonel VanDerVeer, himself denies this; Asks if Boynton can identify the officer that commanded the 21st to charge.
  10. Arnold McMahan, Toledo, Ohio, July 25, 1889 (draft)
    Letter to J.S. Fullerton, Esq., St.Louis, MO; Describes his involvement at Chickamauga; Notes an article by Fullerton in the April, 1887 edition of the Century Magazine; Quotes several sentences from it about a regiment that made a charge even though it had no ammunition and its subsequent capture; Speculates on the identity of this regiment and asks if Fullerton can identify it.
  11. Arnold McMahan, Toledo, Ohio, August 6, 1889 (draft)
    Letter to Colonel Judson W. Bishop; Asks Bishop of the 2nd Minnesota for his recollections of the relief of the 21st at Chickamauga and poses several questions.
  12. Arnold McMahan, Toledo, Ohio, August 12, 1889 (draft)
    Letter to the Hon. M.M. Bauthman; Recalls the sacrifice of the 22nd Michigan, 21st Ohio and 89th Ohio at Chickamauga; Notes lack of official recognition; Suggests that Congress should take some action; Offers to provide Bauthman with the facts.
  13. Arnold McMahan, Toledo, Ohio, August 12, 1889 (draft)
    Letter to General Judson W. Bishop, St. Paul; Notes agreement in their recollections of the relief of the 21st by the 2nd but difference over the time at which the relief occurred; Expresses wish that he could journey to Chattanooga and meet Bishop there but suspects his health will prevent him from doing so.
  14. Arnold McMahan, Toledo, Ohio, March 24, 1890 (draft)
    Letter to General J.M. Brannan; Notes existence of written histories of Chickamauga (reports and dispatches in the War Department) but thinks that the unwritten history needs to be unearthed to provide a complete account of what happened; Refers to "the rebellion record Vol. 30 pt. 1" to pose questions about Brannan's account of the 21st's capture.

Folder 11

  1. Arnold McMahan, Toledo, Ohio, January 22, 1890 (draft)
    Letter to G.E. Dolton, St. Louis, MO; Response to a call for information in the National Tribune; Expresses interest in Dolton's projected map of "Horse Shoe Ridge" at the Battle of Chickamauga; Identifies his position at the battle and the sort of information he can provide; Requests more specifics about the information Dolton needs.
  2. Arnold McMahan, Toledo, Ohio, January 30, 1890 (draft)
    Letter to G.E. Dolton, St. Louis, MO; Acknowledges a letter from Dolton and notes his appreciation of the way in which Dolton's account of the battle on "Horse Shoe Ridge" answered some questions McMahan had; Discusses the variety of opinions that are extant about the battle and especially the capture of the 21st; Traces some of the errors to their sources; Provides his own account of the capture of the 21st, spurred by Dolton's reference to it as a "quiet capture."
  3. Arnold McMahan, Toledo, OH, February 6, 1890 (draft)
    Letter to G.E. Dolton, St. Louis, MO; Acknowledges receipt of Dolton's map and letter; Notes receipt of War Department maps; Discouraged at differences.
  4. Arnold McMahan, Toledo, Ohio, May 10, 1890 (draft)
    Letter to Redfield Proctor, Secretary of War; Notes enclosure of a letter by McMahan about the War Department maps that never reached its proper destination; Refers to desirability of getting the maps correct in the light of planned National Park of the battlefield.
  5. Arnold McMahan, Toledo, OH, April 21, 1890 (enclosure, draft)
    Letter to Redfield Proctor; Detailed analysis of an error on Map #8 of the War Department maps of Chickamauga.
  6. Arnold McMahan, Toledo, Ohio, May 17, 1890 (draft)
    Letter to Redfield Proctor, Secretary of War; Notes receiving Proctor's letter of May 13 responding to his questions about War Department maps of Chickamauga; Gives a detailed analysis of Map 8 produced by the Department drawing upon pertinent sections of Part 1, Vol. 30 of the War of the Rebellion Records as evidence for the claim that errors exist in the maps.
  7. Arnold McMahan, Toledo, Ohio, July 5, 1890 (draft)
    Letter to Colt's Patent Fire Arms Manufacturing Company, Hartford, CT; Asserts the importance of determining the position of troops at Chickamauga; Indicates that the 21st O.V.I. was the only regiment to have Colt's revolving rifles at the battle; Notes the regiment was positioned in a woods and many trees survive containing the bullets they fired; Requests a box of the bullets used in the revolving rifles to use as evidence that the bullets in the trees could only be those of the 21st.
  8. Arnold McMahan, September 9, 1889 (draft)
    Letter to the Secretary of War; Notes a proposal to remedy desertion and claims it will prove useless; Declares desertion is caused by haughtiness of army officers and can only be cured by having officers rise from the ranks.
  9. Arnold McMahan, [September 16, 1889?](draft)
    Open letter to the reunion meeting of the 21st; Assures them he is there in spirit; Notes that their sacrifices were not in vain since the Union was preserved, slavery ended, and prosperity and peace fills the land; (See response--Box 13, Folder 15, Item 8).

MS 562: Introduction | Transcript List
MS 562 Series Description: MS 562: Introduction | 86th O.V.I. Records | Arnold McMahan Papers
MS 562 Abstracts: Part 1 (McMahan Correspondence) | Part 2 (Box 12) | Part 3 (Box 13) | Inventory
Manuscripts by Subject | Civil War Collections