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Linus Patrick Correspondence - MMS 1157

Linus Anthony Patrick served with Company K, 121st Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was killed in battle at Kenesaw Mountain, Georgia.

Correspondence from Linus

February 13, 1862
October 27, 1862
November 4, 1862
November 11, 1862
December 6, 1862
Fragment [12/1862]
December 10, 1862

February 13, 1862

Roundhead Ohio
Feb 13 1862

Miss Poe

I send you a few lines according to promise to inform you what I know concerning the "Grand Fete" which is to be at Mr Lemen's tomorrow evening. As far as I can learn it is to be a "general pitch in" free for all who wish to attend, but I suppose you are as well posted on this matter as I am so I will close, hoping to see you soon yours & c

Linus A. Patrick

(on the back.): If a tract of land 6 1/2 miles long & four miles broad which cost $1 1/4 per acre be exchanged for the same quantity in the form of a square, & subsequently be divided into one hundred equal & square forms, 3/8 of which should bring at auction $11 3/4 per acre; 2/3 of them $12 per acre

[illegible writing]

October 27, 1862

Camp Reid, Perryville Kentucky
October 27, 1862

My Dear Father

Your kind and welcome letter was recd yesterday morning and I take
The very earliest opportunity of sending you an answer - I had began to think you had forgotten me, but I suppose it was on account of the mails as they have been very unregular since we have been here- our letters have been going on to our Brigade but yesterday and today the letters have been coming in by the whole sale - you wanted me to write & give a general description of the battle - Capt Odors death & c I wrote a letter to John McCullach and gave a general description of how our Regiment was taken into the engagement & all things pertaining there to & I have also just finished a letter to Capt. Odors wife in which I gave a full detail of Capt Odors death and it is therefor unnecessary for me to say any more upon the subject for I told McCullach to show you & and the rest of my friends his letter & Mrs Odor will undoubtedly do the same - Father it seems hard that - a Regiment like ours - which had been in the service but five weeks and nearly all that time spent in moving around should be be rushed right - into an engagement & that too right in the hottest of the fight - while old Regiments that have been in the service 12 and 14 months & and never smelt gun powder were laying on their arms & playing with their fingers a short distance away - I say it was murder to lead our regiment where they did in the condition it was in - I blame our colonel with it, for he need not have taken his Regiment from Camp Delaware when he did if he had not consented to it Our company is in a pretty bad fix at present - the 1st Lieut - has been sick ever since the battle & the 2nd Lieut was sick for a week or so & I then had to take charge of everything myself They both reported for duty again yesterday but it does not make it any easier for me - for when there Is anything to do they run for me & I either have to do it my-self or tell them what to do - Our 1st Lieut is an easy good natured sort of a fellow, but he is weakly & and if he was stout he would never make a military officer - Our 2nd Lieut I have told you of & as he is not worth speaking of I will not say any thing more about him - I told Ben's wife to send Richard Odor and John Rumer after him & now if they come which I want them to do have them to take a store box and bring some things for the boys There was a fellow came down from Delaware the other day & brought a box full of things for the boys - The boys needs dried and canned fruit - green apples and some thing of that - kind - I would like to have two under - shirts & a pair of kid skin moracco gloves lined inside with something soft and warm - I would like for you to speak with some of the citizens who are deeply interested in this matter & have them see all the friends of the boys & have these things sent if Odor and Rumer come after Ben - which I want them to do - The boys from Rushsylvania are generally all well - Lawson Roberts is in the hospital & I tell you we miss him for he was all life when he was with us- Dave Dorman is still at louisville & Bratton is at camp Dennison - But Rumer went to the hospital on saturday he has the ague he was up here to day & will report for duty in a day or two Johnny Wintz is also at the hospital but will be all right soon - Bill Konkle is at the company able for duty he wanted to come to the company two or three days before he did but the surgeon would not let him Andy Sweeny is just as good a soldier as there is in the Regiment he has never missed a roll call except when on duty or excused he is cooking for a mess at present & is up every morning at 4 he sends his best respects to you and all the rest of his friends - Do you know any thing about our county bounty? If you know any process by which we can get it I wish you would tell me, for I would like to have you get mine & use what you need of it & and put the rest in safe keeping I shall have to close soon I want you to write soon & and write often for nothing gives me more pleasure than to hear from you

Hoping to hear from you soon & remain
as ever your obedient and affectionate son,
Linus

Send your letter to Perryville via Louisville to follow

November 4, 1862

Camp Reid near Perryville Kentucky
Nov. 4, 1862

Dear Father, Mother, Brother & Sister

I received a letter from Lucy a short time since & take the first opportunity of sending you an answer, to inform you that I am not dead but alive & well, able for duty & my rations, Nothing of any importance has occurred here since I wrote you last - we are still in camp here drilling & guarding the sick & wounded from any attack by the Rebels, as soon as they are removed we will probably go farther down into the land of Dixie - While Ben Odor was alive I was contented & happy, since he died I have not liked the condition of affairs in our company, but I hope we will have things in a better condition shortly - I am still contented with the service & want to see the thing through Some of the boys have been up about the colonels office & say a dispatch has just come in for us to march to morrow morning at six oclock whether it is true or not I do not know nor do I care - When I came into the service I weighed but one hundred & sixty nine pounds. I was up at the Quarter Master's to day & was weighed & I weighed one hundred and seventy seven pounds having gained 8 pounds since I came into the Army - the report that we have to march to morrow is true - we have orders to march at three oclock to morrow morning & I have just been around to the different Messes telling the cooks to prepare three days rations & have the men pack them in their haversacks & as it is now about seven oclock P.M. I will have to close for I have a great deal to do tonight - the Lieut. is going down town to see old Glover our 2nd Lieut who is down at the hospital & I have charge of things - When those men come for Ben send me some things - two undershirts & one pair of gloves & the boots if Bob Moore has them done but I will write as soon as we stop again & let you know where we are - No more at present Write Soon

Your affectionate Son

Linus
Co. K 121
Reg. Ohio Volunteer

P.S.
Send your letter via Louisville to follow Regiment
Linus

November 11, 1862

Lebanon Marion County Kentucky
Nov, 11, 1862

My Dear Father

Your kind letter of the 5th inst has just been read and I proceed immediately to answer it - I wrote you a letter yesterday and mailed it this morning, we were on provost - guard down in town at that time, but we have been relieved, we were relieved today at twelve oclock, by a portion of the 50th Ohio, one of the Regiments of our Brigade - Our Brigade which is composed of the 98th, 50th, & l2lst Ohio Regiments and the 80th Indiana Regiment are all encamped together about half a mile from the edge of town - we have a very pleasant place to camp in, or it will be as soon as it is cleaned up which they are doing as fast as possible, it is in an oak wood pasture and has been used to feed in, consequently there is a great deal of rubbish in the camp, it has been raked up in piles & they are burning it this afternoon, & it is so smokey that a person can hardly walk through the camp - We have not got any tents yet, but I quarter in the Lieutenants tents as I have to take care of the Company books - you wanted to know what kind of transportation there was to where we are. The transportation is good now & will be as long as we stay here You can come all the way from Rushsylvania to Lebanon by rail-road either via of Cincinnati and Louisville or via Indianapolis & Louisville, the fare will be about - $10, or at least that is what a man told me he had to pay from Delaware Ohio and the distance is about the same - I want good, fine. Knit shirts the largest and longest you can get - I hope Rumer has started long ere this reaches you & I hope he has my shirts, boots, gloves & c & some provision for the company - if he has not started yet, have him start immediately. We have no commissioned officers elected or appointed yet, but I suppose we will have to have two as our 2nd Lieut is about to resign as he has just this moment sold his uniform - he was left back at Perryville & came up yesterday - Father I hope you will excuse me for not writing a longer letter, but I recd four or five letters to day & as our company came off Provost guard to day, we are off duty this afternoon & I want to answer some of them & our company is a little mixed up some of the sick men coming up from Perryville & it will require some time to get the books straightened up again & my head is so confused that I can scarcely think of anything, but I guess I have written everything necessary - Send Rumer with the thingsd if he has not started, for now is the best chance he will ever have- Write soon

Your affectionate Son
Linus A Patrick
send your letter to Lebanon via Louisville

(top of letter upside down): I want my boots made large so I can march in them easily - I wish I had a five dollar green back - until we draw our money

(at bottom): Do not have Bob Moore make my boots too small

December 6, 1862

Columbia Adair County Kentucky
December 6th 1862

Dear Father

Lucys letter of the 29th November was recd yesterday & I hasten to answer - who has been telling that nothing can be expressed to us? I wish some people would attend to their own business! When I send for anything I want it - Did you get the letter I sent to Bob Moore? Send those boots shirts & things right off as soon as you receive this, if you have not already sent them - send me two pounds of good smoking tobacco - Jack Moore and Joseph Moore want Bob to send their things so you can put them all in one box & send together pay the charges there and it will come all right. Direct to Linus A Patrick Company K 12lst Regiment 0.V.I 34th Brigade Lebanon Ky via Louisville to be forwarded to Regiment & we will get it for our teams have to go to Lebanon every few day & they bring all packages for the Regt - If you have the money to spare you may send it to me by letter - Direct your letter to Colombia Kentucky via Louisville to follow Regt We have gone into winter quarters here & will stay here all winter if nothing happens - write soon & send the box immediately, but I hope the box has started ere this

No More Your Son
Linus

Did you receive that package of letters sent home

[To Bob Moore]

Bob Moore

Jo & Jack both need a pair of boots & want you to make them for them these corn field gaiters the government furnishes are poor things for winter - make our boots & let the people at home wait & when the pay master comes around we will load you down with green backs - a heavy sole is best for army use - I can write nothing more for I am in a great hurry to get this in before the mail goes out

Yours & C
Linus Patrick

Bob if you get my boots made in time you must make the[m] plent[y] large & a very heavy sole with light tops Also Linuses the same "very large" please send those other things that Jack and I sent for. Tell those people that know so much about our things coming through to look to their own business. We are all firstrate - We have about 1 inch of snow on the ground & those gaiters are awful cold to the feel - we have gone into new quarters right in the centre of a 1,000 acre block where the Rebs could not find us in a month we have a Brush fence round us for rifle pits so they could not take us by surprise if they were to come across us in haste

Joseph Moore

December 1862 (fragment)

[Probably December 1862]

N.B.

We belong to Websters Brigade Jackson Division McCooks corpse. Webster & Jackson were both killed the day of the battle. I would like to have Bob Moore make me a pait of calfskin boots, doble felt threble soles and send them to me. If he makes them he must be very careful to make them to large.

Linus

December 10, 1862

Colombia Kentucky
December 10 1862

Dear Father

I take this opportunity of sending you a few lines - William Odor recd a letter from Jesse Roberts today in which he said he would give two dollars for the purpose of bearing Bob Moores expenses to the Regt & back - we consulted the matter over this evening & Jack, Jo, & all the rest of the boys concluded it would be the safest plan of getting our things to have him come along with them provided the people who are interested in Co K 121st - O.V.I would donate liberally toward bearing his expenses which I think they will undoubtedly do, but we do not want him to come & lose his time & have to bear his own expenses So I guess you had better make a subscription & and get the money & start Bob right off as soon as you can get the things ready - it will take about thirty dollars to bear his expenses here & back - he can come to Louisville either via Cincinnati or Indianapolis though I believe the latter to be the best route from Louisville he can come to Lebanon by rail & from there to Columbia by stage or government wagons at his pleasure I think he had better come as we expect to stay here some length of time & may be the last opportunity he will ever have of paying us a visit & we would all give every thing we have to see some person from home - the 121st was inspected yesterday on Company & Battalion Drill by Gen Gilberts Inspector General who pronounced us a good Regt & not to be compared with new troops generally The health of the boys is generally good I got a letter from David Dormen & he thinks he will soon be able to join the Regt. no more - have Bob to come with out fail & bring lots of letters

Linus

postscipt page 1. I forgot to say that I am still able for half duty & double rations "All quiet on the Potomac"

postcript page 2: Let Esqr[?] Porter of Belellefontaine know that Bob is coming & he will give something toward bearing his expenses

MMS 1157 - Linus Patrick Correspondence Index
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