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George Kryder Papers - MS 163: Transcripts

Correspondence - 1863

April 7, 1863

Camp near Murfreesboro
April 7th 1863

Dear beloved wife

I now take my pen to write a few lines to you to let you know I am getting along. At present I am not very well although I cannot say that I am sick. About a week ago we got some fresh beef and it physicked me and I have had the diarrhea ever since. And we have just come back from a five day scout and while we were out I took an awful bad cold but a few days rest will straighten me out again for another scout.

Last Friday we started with five day rations to go to Liberty, 30 miles from here where about 6000 rebels were. And that evening we met about five or six hundred and had a little skirmish and the next morning they had retreated beyond Liberty about 2 miles to Snow's Hill (but I would call it a mountain) where they made a stand. And they said there [they] would not a live Yankee get up that hill, though the Yankees were too sharp for them. While some of the force was fighting them in front, the 3rd 4th and 10th Ohio went to the right and nearly cut off their retreat but they had pickets out and gave them the alarm and they sent a regiment out to meet us. The 4th was ahead and they dismounted and a very brisk skirmish went on for about half an hour. When the rebels gave way and our regiment charged after them and in the road lay a dead rebel and my horse jumped over him and there were a number more killed and wounded. The 4th Ohio had one man wounded in the leg and our Reg. had two wounded, one of Co. G's men in the shoulder and one of our Co. in the cheek. The Rebs fled in the greatest confusion losing saddles, blankets, coats, hats by the hundred, guns, saddle bags and satchels and some of the carbines which they captured from our men in Lexington, Ky. I picked up when we stopped a pair of saddle bags with 4 pr. drawers, one calico shirt, and 2 pr of woolen socks and the saddle bags are worth two dollars. In all worth about five dollars. Our Reg. took eleven prisoners, and I heard that we killed 15 and wounded a large number.

Well we came back this side of Liberty and went into camp. Next morning we started toward Lebanon 23 miles from Liberty, went about half way and went into camp. Our Co. was on picket that night. The next day we started for horses. The 4th Ohio was on our right and the 7th Penn to our left and we spread out so That we formed a line about 8 or 10 miles long and every good horse we came to we took along, and we caught a number of bushwhackers that were scattered through the woods and we lived on ham and eggs.

Yesterday we came here and I got your letter of the 29th March and was sorry that you were still troubled with that miserable disease the sick headache, but you must not exert yourself or overdo and perhaps you will not have it so much. I am glad that you got that money. I heard that we are going to get our pay again soon and then I can send you more. You stated Bill Moore wanted to know what you would take for that judgement but you did not tell what he said when you asked him $600.00 If they will pay you six hundred dollars take it but do not take less.

You wish that I had never gone to war. Now I think if you look at it right, you will not wish so, for in the first place it was my duty to come, and by coming as a volunteer I did not have to be drafted and how would we both feel if I had been forced to come. Now I hope you will not trouble yourself about me but think your true and loving husband is doing his duty. We are both suffering more or less though I live in hopes of a better time to come, and you, dear wife, must keep up courage and not worry if you can help it. I know you have a hard place but if we should live to meet again we may spend many happy days and years together.

The talk about us getting furloughs has nearly died down again, but I am still in hope that the war will close before long and then I could come home to stay. For if they will give furloughs they will not be over 20 days and then I would not have a chance to be at home two weeks. But still if I can I will come if I cannot stay more than a week.

You must not worry about that judgement for you do not owe them anything. They can't hurt you. If I get a chance to come home I will try and tend to it. I am glad that the children are well and that Lillie is such a good girl and is so much help to you. You said you was going to have a rib for dinner. I wish that I was there to make it an object for you to cook, for when I am well I have a good appetite.

I think I wrote to you in my last letter that I saw Samuel. He thinks that you gave him particular fits and he takes it pretty well. He gave me the letter to read and by what I could understand, it hit him exactly.

I had a letter from Uncle Jonas and he said that he heard that John was wounded in the battle of Stone River and died in a Rebel Hospital in Murfreesboro on the 2nd of Jan. Uncle sold his farm in Huntington and bought him a small place in Spencer, Medina County.

I have not heard from father since he was with you. I wrote him a letter and perhaps he took offense and will not answer it, but I don't care, for I do not thank him for his discouraging letters. Henry is as well as common. He says his lungs seem to be swelled. The health of the soldiers is generally speaking very good. They are fat, black and saucy and full of fun.

I believe I have given you all the particulars that I can think now so I must bring this letter to a close in hopes of hearing from you soon and that this may reach you all well and in good spirits. No more this time. I am as ever your true and devoted husband,

George Kryder
I have nothing to write to Lillie more than I remember her
so good bye for this time
Write soon and direct as before

April 15, 1863

Camp near Murfreesboro Tenn.
April 15th, 1863

My dear and beloved wife

It is with great pleasure that I t ke my pen to inform you that I am yet alive but not as well as I was a while ago as I took a very bad cold on our scout to Liberty and I have had a severe cough ever since but it is getting better, but I have a diarrhea at present that makes me feel quite shiftless, but I am still able for light duty in camp.

I read your kind letter of the 5th yesterday and was glad to hear from you and that you still think of me. But do not trouble, dear wife and have patience and wait for my coming. I am sorry to tell you that the talk of our getting furloughs has about died off again so it is hard telling when they will give us leave to go to see our loved ones at home. But I hope the time will not be far distant when we can come home to stay, but there is no certainty. But do not despair for think yet that they will give furloughs this summer.

You said that Sarah Babcock had gone to see Frank, and I would say if there was any chance of you staying here that you should come and see me but we could not take much of a visit so be patient, Dear Wife, and hope for the best. I can well imagine how lonesome you are there all alone, but I cannot help it at present and hope you will not fret or cry as it will not make the case better, but it may make you sick and if we should live to see each other I hope we will meet in good health.

We got two months pay yesterday and I will try and send you $30.00. But I hardly dare to for the express Co. is not responsible for it if the rebels should capture a train and get the money, but there is an agent from Ohio that takes the money and gives an order on the county treasury so that 1f I would send you the order you could go or send it to Norwalk and get it and in that way it can not be lost and I will try and send it that way.

My appetite is very poor at present and so I got a can of apple butter from the suttler. It is very dear but it tastes very good. They charged a dollar for a small can.

You wish that I would answer your letter in person, which I would rather do than to write if I could. I am sorry that you still have such a pain in your sides. Only do not overdo yourself if you can help it. The army in general is in very good health though there are a few sick, mostly with colds. Henry is not very well at present. He has a pain in his breast, though not very serious.

The Reg. is ordered on a five day scout tomorrow, but I will not go out, as I do not feel well enough, though I hope it will not be so long.

Well, you thought that I affronted Father in that letter that wrote to him but he wrote to me about a week ago and they were well. I must bring this to a close in hopes that this may reach you all well. This is from your affectionate Husband,

George Kryder

To E. S. Kryder and children

I will write as soon as I send my money to you. Write as soon as you get this. Good bye.

April 21, 1863

Camp Stanley Murfreesboro, Tenn.
April 21, 1863

My Dear and loving wife,

I now take my pen in hand to let you know that I am reasonable well and hope these few lines may reach you all well. I rec'd. your letter of the 12th yesterday and you cannot imagine the pleasure it gave me to learn that your health was better and the children were well and that Mary was getting so big and heavy and that Lillie is such a lady and that she can begin to write letters to me. I am glad to hear from her but if I do not write to her in particular she must not think that I do not think of her, but there is hardly an hour that my thoughts are not at home. I would very much like to come and eat some of them apples that Lillie is saving for me, but I think that she had better not save them for fear they will rot for the talk about us getting furloughs has about all died off again but as soon as there is any possible chance for me I will come. I am really glad, yes, rejoiced that your health is better which I hope and pray may continue on still.

I had a letter from Father about the same time that he wrote to you and he stated to me about that 8O acre lot and if you think that we can pay half down this fall and the balance in yearly payments you might have him buy it, but have the papers made out in our name before you would let him have much money as there are new relations there that would not care much for us if they had our money and us have nothing to show for it. So it will be best to make things safe, but you need not say any thing to father about it, for I wou1d not mistrust him.

I am sorry that you are so much left alone there by your neighbors moving away but you must try and do the best you can. If you think you can work your garden without making yourself sick you might do it, for I would rather you would spend all the money that I send you than have you sacrifice your health for on your health alone depends my happiness for I would rather come home and not have a cent of money coming to us and find you in good health than have a whole county and you always sick. So try and take care of your health. But I think light hoeing may not hurt if you will not overdo yourself. That is about that. You try to excuse because you did not answer my letter sooner but you never delay longer than that it will do very well.

I am glad that you got them $40.00 that I sent you. I wrote about a week ago to you that we got two months pay and Charles Benham and I gave our money to Capt. Gaylord who was going to Nashville and express it for us there but he has not gone yet but thought he would go today. You will find $30.00 at Mrs. Benham's, as we put our money in one envelope, as it would cost just as much to send $30.O0 as it would $130.00 and it would be just as safe. Charley said that she will send you word when to come and get it or you can send after it.

I just now rec'd. your letter of the 16th which was mailed on the 17th. It came in four days and it more than pleases me to hear from you so often. And I am glad that I did not send this before I got this last letter, for I can answer them both in one, for I am out of stamps, and if you can, you might send me some.

On account of my appetite not being good, I have spent considerable money for things to eat. Everything is very dear that we buy. We bought some pickles at 40 cts. Pr gal, but that is cheap to what the sutler sells them at. He sells them at $1.00 per bottle that holds a little over a pint. But I do not buy any at that price. Cheese is 40cts. pr. lb. and crackers that we used to buy at home for 10 cts. pr. lb. they sell here at 25 and 30 cts. I bought a small can of applebutter for $1.00. It was very dear but it gave me an and I feel pretty well again. I think there was some kind of fever working in me for my legs were swelled yesterday, but today they are better.

The regiment is out on a 6 day scout and Henry is out with them. He is better than he was. They went yesterday. Captain Colver came back a few days ago as lively as ever, but our Captain (Gaylord) is not much better than a wooden man but our first and second Lieutenants are as good as they make them. The Major of the 2nd Battalion was appointed Col. after Col. Zahm resigned and he has been home on leave of absence and just came back yesterday. He is a first rate man. The boys all like him. His name is Col. Paramour.

I wish I could send some of my clothes home this summer for I am afraid I will lose some of them in moving about this summer, but I will not draw any more than I have to, and I think the government will owe me some when we settle again for our clothing.

I wish you could see the woods here, how nice and green they are getting down here. Peach trees are done blowing these two weeks.

I am glad that you have better courage and will try and do the best you can, which is as good as anybody could do. We just had a very good dinner. It was batter cakes and I had apple butter to put on mine. They were first rate. It is thundering and we are going to have some rain. The weather is fine. Well I must close for the want of room. No more at present but remain as ever your true and affectionate Husband,

George Kryder

to E. S. Kryder and children. Write soon.

May 5, 1863

Camp Standley, Murfreeeboro, Tenn.
May 11th, 1863.

My Dear Wife:

I now take my pen in hand to let you know how I am getting along. At present I am well and hearty and in good spirits and I hope and trust this letter may reach you the same. I rec'd. your kind letter of the 3rd today and you cannot imagine the pleasure and joy it gave me to hear from you. I waited a long time but it was with patience till at length the welcome messenger came to hand.

Since I wrote to you I have not got any news of any importance. Your letter came in four days after it was mailed on the 7th. I have been on picket only once for nearly four weeks. The reason was after I was able to ride again I had no horse, as I lent mine to go on a scout and he came back with such a sore back that I turned him over and did not get another till today I got another one.

You say you was going to have a boiled dinner, which I would like to have a share of, but since I have got well, anything tastes good, but I would like some fresh fish. It is curious about these rivers in Dixie. They do not afford fish as the streams in the north do for I have not had a mess of fish since I have been in the army. I am glad that you have such good neighbors that do so much for you, Mr. Crosby especially I think done you a great favor in keeping the cow and plowing your garden for which he has my sincere thanks.

I have not heard from father for some time, but I had a letter from Sam yesterday on an answer that I wrote to him in which I tried to bore him for sending to father for money to buy his discharge, which he denies but he owns up that he sent to father for money. And he says he is not ashamed of it either and he says that if you and I knew what situation he and his family was in when he enlisted, that we would not blame him for so doing. But do blame the shiftless man for when he has money he will buy things that he does not need, and then when he is sick he has not got it. But that does not better the case to write about and the time may come when I may need money but I know where I can send for it without sending to father for it. But I do not know but it is a good plan as that would be that much clear gain, but still I do not approve of the plan.

I had my picture taken and I gave it to Capt. Gaylord to take it to Nashville to send it to you. It cost me two dollars. They would not let me have it without the case. I wish I had waited till now for I look healthier but that was the first opportunity I had and I thought I would make use of it. I also sent $30.00 with Captain Livermore. I put it in with C. Benham's and you can get it there at Mrs.Benhams by going or sending for it. The reason I put it in with his was this. It would not cost but little more to send both in one than to send one package alone. I have sent you several newspapers and if you say so I will send you some more. We have to pay l0 cts. apiece for them but we are bound to have the news and the news are pretty good. The today's paper says the Union Flag floats over Richmond the Rebe1 Capital and Gen. Grant's army is doing good work in Mississippi and we do not know what day we will get orders to march against Gen. Bragg in south east Tenn. For the Rebs. are getting pretty bold.

I hardly know what to say about that land in Henry Cc. but it is not best to be too much in a hurry for I may some time get a chance to come and see it.

You say you are glad to get such a big letter and I am too. Yours today was a good one. I will try and give you all the news and that is all you can ask. I hardly know what to write any more only that we have very beautiful weather with cool nights and very warm in the middle of the day. The woods are most beautiful. If I could only sit in its green shades with you once again, but hope the time is coming fast, for our men are getting into the heart of the rebellion and they have arrested that vile Traitor C. L. Vallandingham who done so much mischief in Ohio. I must stop and go and feed and curry my horse.

My horse is fed and supper is over and I am going to write a little more and I hardly know what, but I will tell you that we turned over our Sibley tents and now we have shelter tents just large enough for two men and we carry them with us on our horses and the way we put up is, we cut two stakes or crotches about four feet long and lay a pole on top of the stakes. (But I have to tell you how our tents are made.) They are two breadths and a quarter of heavy factory cloth about two yards in length with buttons and button holes on three sides of them (two are to go together) and when the two are together the four corners are fastened with stakes and it looks like a house roof set on the ground with the gable ends open. We have (four of us) buttoned our tents together and have raised it about two feet up, and closed the bottom and end with grain sacks and when it is warm we have just the pleasantest shelters you could imagine. We have a floor in it about six inches so we do not have to lay on the damp ground.

Henry is well. I must come to a close for want of room but I have not written to Lillie yet and I do not know what to write, but I suppose she can soon get dinner when Ma can't get time to get it. No more this evening. This from your true and devoted Husband,

George Kryder

To E. S. Kryder, write as soon as you get this. Good Bye.

May 11, 1863

Camp Standley, Murfreeeboro, Tenn.
May 11th, 1863.

My Dear Wife:

I now take my pen in hand to let you know how I am getting along. At present I am well and hearty and in good spirits and I hope and trust this letter may reach you the same. I rec'd. your kind letter of the 3rd today and you cannot imagine the pleasure and joy it gave me to hear from you. I waited a long time but it was with patience till at length the welcome messenger came to hand.

Since I wrote to you I have not got any news of any importance. Your letter came in four days after it was mailed on the 7th. I have been on picket only once for nearly four weeks. The reason was after I was able to ride again I had no horse, as I lent mine to go on a scout and he came back with such a sore back that I turned him over and did not get another till today I got another one.

You say you was going to have a boiled dinner, which I would like to have a share of, but since I have got well, anything tastes good, but I would like some fresh fish. It is curious about these rivers in Dixie. They do not afford fish as the streams in the north do for I have not had a mess of fish since I have been in the army. I am glad that you have such good neighbors that do so much for you, Mr. Crosby especially I think done you a great favor in keeping the cow and plowing your garden for which he has my sincere thanks.

I have not heard from father for some time, but I had a letter from Sam yesterday on an answer that I wrote to him in which I tried to bore him for sending to father for money to buy his discharge, which he denies but he owns up that he sent to father for money. And he says he is not ashamed of it either and he says that if you and I knew what situation he and his family was in when he enlisted, that we would not blame him for so doing. But do blame the shiftless man for when he has money he will buy things that he does not need, and then when he is sick he has not got it. But that does not better the case to write about and the time may come when I may need money but I know where I can send for it without sending to father for it. But I do not know but it is a good plan as that would be that much clear gain, but still I do not approve of the plan.

I had my picture taken and I gave it to Capt. Gaylord to take it to Nashville to send it to you. It cost me two dollars. They would not let me have it without the case. I wish I had waited till now for I look healthier but that was the first opportunity I had and I thought I would make use of it. I also sent $30.00 with Captain Livermore. I put it in with C. Benham's and you can get it there at Mrs.Benhams by going or sending for it. The reason I put it in with his was this. It would not cost but little more to send both in one than to send one package alone. I have sent you several newspapers and if you say so I will send you some more. We have to pay l0 cts. apiece for them but we are bound to have the news and the news are pretty good. The today's paper says the Union Flag floats over Richmond the Rebe1 Capital and Gen. Grant's army is doing good work in Mississippi and we do not know what day we will get orders to march against Gen. Bragg in south east Tenn. For the Rebs. are getting pretty bold.

I hardly know what to say about that land in Henry Cc. but it is not best to be too much in a hurry for I may some time get a chance to come and see it.

You say you are glad to get such a big letter and I am too. Yours today was a good one. I will try and give you all the news and that is all you can ask. I hardly know what to write any more only that we have very beautiful weather with cool nights and very warm in the middle of the day. The woods are most beautiful. If I could only sit in its green shades with you once again, but hope the time is coming fast, for our men are getting into the heart of the rebellion and they have arrested that vile Traitor C. L. Vallandingham who done so much mischief in Ohio. I must stop and go and feed and curry my horse.

My horse is fed and supper is over and I am going to write a little more and I hardly know what, but I will tell you that we turned over our Sibley tents and now we have shelter tents just large enough for two men and we carry them with us on our horses and the way we put up is, we cut two stakes or crotches about four feet long and lay a pole on top of the stakes. (But I have to tell you how our tents are made.) They are two breadths and a quarter of heavy factory cloth about two yards in length with buttons and button holes on three sides of them (two are to go together) and when the two are together the four corners are fastened with stakes and it looks like a house roof set on the ground with the gable ends open. We have (four of us) buttoned our tents together and have raised it about two feet up, and closed the bottom and end with grain sacks and when it is warm we have just the pleasantest shelters you could imagine. We have a floor in it about six inches so we do not have to lay on the damp ground.

Henry is well. I must come to a close for want of room but I have not written to Lillie yet and I do not know what to write, but I suppose she can soon get dinner when Ma can't get time to get it. No more this evening. This from your true and devoted Husband,

George Kryder

To E. S. Kryder, write as soon as you get this. Good Bye.

May 20-21, 1863

Camp near Murfreesboro
May 20th, 1863

Dear wife,

I take this present opportunity to write a few lines to you know that I am well and hearty and hope these lines may reach you all the same. I rec'd. your letter of the 12th day before yesterday and was glad that you were well but sorry that Lillie was not well. Tell her she must not fret for me for I can not come any sooner than if she would not fret.

I put my clothes and Henry's in a box and expressed them to Centerton and Henry has written to Trimmer's folks to take his out there. I sent one overcoat and two blankets and a shirt and pr drawers 2 pr. socks and l pr of saddlebags and a few little notions with a few of our Lincoln sweet cakes (crackers). I put a few newspapers in and little red memorandum book that I got that I got out of a Secesh store at Hartsville, Tenn. and two pr of glove. Henry did not send anything but overcoat and two blankets. Our clothes are not particularly marked but his coat has a pocket in and mine has not, but mine is shot through the back, and my bright colored blanket has one hole burned through and the dark one has got a K branded between the black stripe and the end, and his has H. H. S. on.

The night after I sent you the other letter we were called up at 12 o'clock to go on a scout with one day rations to march at half past one. No one knew where we were going till about daylight. We found ourselves at Lavergne, but no rebels were there but Brigade that Sam is in is laying there. We halted about an hour and then went about 5 miles on river and stood picket till the next day we were relieved and we came back to Lavergne and we were there two nights and one day and I went and seen Sam and he can not speak out loud yet and I had quite a chat with him and then we came back and our Co. went on picket and yesterday we moved camp. We were too far from water. Now we have it close by.

You heard that it as the 3rd Ohio that was taken prisoners. That was true but it was the 3rd Ohio Infantry. There has been none of our Reg. taken since the 20th Jan when they came pretty near getting me.

I am glad you got my picture all right. I have not sent any papers since those first ones for there has not been much news lately. You said there was a button off my coat and want to know whether you shall come and sew it on. I guess not. I think if you would see the patch that I put on my knee you wou1d think that I could sew on my own buttons.

When I was in Lavergne Sam told me where Ezra is. He is in the 1st Indiana Battery, 2nd Brigade, 14th Division, l3th Army Corp., Gen. McClernard commanding, Milliken's Bend, La. and he also told me Catherine's address is Etna Green, P.O. Kosciusco, Ind.

May 21st. I am not as well this morning. The reason is yesterday I ate some walnuts in the forenoon and then ate some greens for dinner and they made me sick and I vomited them all up but it will be all right in a day or two. Henry does not feel as well as common on account of diarrhea.

Day before yesterday we got orders to turn our clothes over. They are to be taken to Nashville and stored there for the summer, but I think it is the best that we sent ours home for if they should get lost, I would blame no one but myself and if they should get home safe, I know they will not rot as they did last year. I will try and send you some more papers. The news from Mississippi country is favorable and the Rebs are getting discouraged.

You say you sent me some stamps and I got them all right. I am glad you get my letters regular, and I am glad to get yours regular. We are camped on the battle ground about 1/2 mile from Stone River and yesterday when we went to water our horses some of the boys found a dead rebel who had been killed in the battle and floated in some floodwood and there he sticks yet, awful to think of and worse to look at.

Well I believe I have given you all the news that I can think of so I will come to a close in hopes of hearing from you soon. No more at present but still remaining your true and devoted husband

George Kryder

To Elisabeth S. Kryder

Oh I almost forgot. Sam had a letter from Salome and she said that Joe is getting better

Write soon and direct as before
Good Bye

June 8, 1863

Camp near Murfreesboro Tenn.
June 8th, 1863

Dear Wife

I am now seated to write to you to let you know that I am well and hope this letter may find you as it leaves me. I rec'd. your letter of the 31st yesterday which was welcomed very much. I am sorry that you have such mean scoundrels there to molest you there alone, but I would advise you to get the gun loaded and keep it ready for for such mean low-lived villains, if you only had my revolver there, that would be the thing to cure them. Try and get a boy to stay with you, if you can. If anyone comes around your house at night in a sneaking way, just shoot him, or if you do not hit him, perhaps it will scare him. If I was there, they might come I think it would be to their sorrow. Only be patient and 17 months more will find us together again if it is the Lord's will. But I still hope this war will close before that time. I am glad you have a good garden for it is nearly half the living. I hope that I can come and eat some of your cabbage.

You say your garden is the place where you can throw off the blues. I think if I was there I would keep you from having the blues, but only keep up courage and hope for a better time to come.

You say you was just having a feast with walnuts and apples. The apples I would like to have had a share of but as for the walnuts, we have any amount of them here and mulberries are ripe, and I get all I want of them and then I wish our little girls had some of them and you the balance to bake into pies. I think we would have a nice feast. You say you have about 20 lbs. butter which I wish I had a few pounds of. I could make use of it when I go on picket. I got milk for the sugar that I do not use. If you can get you and the children's likeness taken without too much trouble, I would like to have them. If you have them taken try and get them on paste board for they do not soil so easy. If you send it, do not send a case for I have no way to carry it.

You think that it is curious that I send stockings home. It is not curious at all, for I do not wear any this summer and when I want some I can draw them. They charge us 32 cts a pair for them.

Now I will tell you about our duty. Last Tuesday we got orders for our company to go to Murfreesboro for Provost Guards to stay a week. Well, on Wednesday morning we went down and were there 24 hours when we got orders to go on an eight day scout and Wednesday morning we started with our Reg. the 14th and 10 Ohio. We went to liberty and to Snow Hill. There we startled a small squad of rebels and we followed them on toward Smithville about 13 miles from Liberty and when about two miles this side of Smithville, skirmishing became quite brisk and they wounded one of Co. B's men quite serious and from there they fell back beyond the town where they made another stand and our men brought up their two pieces of artillery and threw about 10 or a dozen shells amongst them and they fell back to Liberty with about 5 or 6 prisoners and we layed there on Saturday and yesterday we came back to camp. There are some prospects that the Rebels will attack us here and if they will they will get the nicest little whipping they ever had, for Rosecrans is getting Murfreesboro very strongly fortified and the men all have full confidence in him as a commander. And I have seen him several times and he is a Noble looking man. Lieutenant Col. Murry has resigned and Major Howland has command of the regiment. I think I wrote to [you] that Henry had gone to General Turchin's [?] headquarters and this morning he came back to the Co. again. He is pretty rugged again. Those three men that were taken the time that I run such a narrow escape have been exchanged and are back here again. I expect we will get our pay before long again. Charley Benham says his money got home all right and mine must be there too for it was all in one envelope. Last Friday there was a man hung in Murfreesboro for deserting and murder. He deserted our army and went to bushwhacking and robbed a union man of his money and then shot him in the face and then cut the man's tongue out before he was dead. Horrible! Horrible!

I believe I have given you about all the news that I can think of, so I must bring this to a close. In hopes of hearing from you soon. No more at present, but remain as ever your true and devoted

Husband,
George Kryder
To Elisabeth and the children
I wrote Ezra a letter last week. I have not heard from [him] since I saw about a month ago

Write soon and direct as before
Good Bye.

June 15, 1863

Camp Turchin near Murfreesboro
June 15th 1863

Dear Wife

I take this present opportunity or writing to you in answer to yours of the 7th which came in due time I rec'd it last Friday. It came in four days and I was glad to learn that you were all well. I am well and hearty and hope these lines may reach you the same. The reason that I did not answer your letter sooner was that Afternoon we went on drill and Saturday morning I and four other men were detailed to go on picket and did not get back till yesterday afternoon and This morning we drilled an hour and a half and in about an hour we have to go and graze our horses. So you see we are kept very busy, but I will write a few in lines and write again as soon as I can.

You asked me if I was in the skirmish that 6 B was in I think I was and I think I wrote to you in my other letter or if I did not I forgot it. When we go on a scout, I generally tell the particulars. I am glad you got your money, but am sorry that there are so many thieves and burglars in your neighborhood. But I hope the conscript will take some or them in the army. You had better find out whether you can let them sheep out before you buy any, for if you would buy and then have no place to put them it would be a bad thing. But if you can let them out for a pound of wool and the same number of sheep, do so, for that will be better than money at 6 per cent. You say you are afraid to stay there. I do not blame you for it, for I suppose there are some very mean persons in your neighborhood. But I would advise you to get your gun loaded and shoot the first villain that attempts to do you wrong. If you only had one of our six shooting army revolvers I think you could defend yourself well. Try and get a boy to stay with you if you can. You must try and keep up good courage and hope for a better time to come. Be of good cheer for I hope to be with you and those loved ones again. And if circumstances will not allow us to have furloughs there is one consolation, that is our time will be out in about fifteen months more and if it is the Lords will to spare my life and health that much longer, we will see each other again. I am glad the children are well and that they are such comfort to you. Teach them well and study their temper and improve their dispositions if possible, for on them depends our future happiness.

You say you have not heard from George nor father in some time, nor I have not heard from father in about two months. He wrote me a letter that did not suit my politics and I answered it accordingly, and I suppose I affronted him, but I do not care a straw for it. If he can not write loyal letters to me, I do not want him to write at all, and I suppose he took the hint. I had a letter from Sam about a week ago and he was well all except his speech is very curious.

You must not so hard as to make yourself sick and do not trouble yourself too much for me, for I think you are well aware that it will not better the circumstances one bit. You want to know what I will say to you selling the old cow this fall. I believe she is most too good a cow to sell. The old saying is, when you have a good thing, keep it. And you want to know what I say to your raising the calf. I think it is a good plan if you can get it kept over winter. You say of Mary singing of me being in Dixie. I wish I could see them. She must be a stout, stout girl. Tell Lillie she must grow fast or Mary will soon be the biggest. Oh how I wish you and them could have some or the nice mulberries that I have here when I go out on picket, and yesterday I had some nice dewberries. They are just getting ripe. There will be lots of blackberries again this summer and there will be some apples and peaches but not as many as last year. Yesterday we had a hard thunderstorm and a nice rain, and it rained a little nearly all night but this morning it cleared off and this is a beautiful day. Henry is well at present. You did not say whether you got that box that Henry and I sent to you. I have looked over my clothing account today and it is twenty five dollars and sixty cents, and five or six dollars will be all that I will need more this year. So that the government will owe me for clothing when the year is up, that is if I will not have to draw overcoat and blankets this fall. Well, I hardly know what more to write on this page but if I could see you I could find enough to tell you to fill a hundred pages.

Well, a few lines to Lillie. I wish I could see you Lillie. I have just shaved and washed and combed my head and now I would like to have a kiss from you. I guess I will have you comb my head, I guess you are most big enough to get dinner when Ma is sick.

I believe I have given you about all the news that I can think of at present, so will come to a close in hopes of hearing from you soon. No more this time but remain your true and loving husband,

George Kryder
To Elisabeth S. Kryder
and little girls

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