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Hill/Morgan Family Papers - MS 190: Transcripts

Charles M. Gano to Henry W. Hill - February 1862

February 3, 1862

Camp Jefferson
Harte Co. Ky
February 3rd

Dear brother,

I received your letter today and was glad to hear from you but was very sorry to hear that you was all sick. It is hard for me to hear that Harriet is sick so much but it appears to me that I can't get anything but bad news. But if you will get the doctor to write to me and state the case as though there was no hopes of her getting any better. I could get a furlough and come home and if you would write that you thought that she would not get well and that you thought that I had better come home I think that I could get one. I would like to come home and see you all once more. That is the only way that I can get home and you will oblige me much. I have made up my mind to come home and see you all once more I want to see Mary and Harriet before we are parted by death and then it will be all right if you grant my request you will oblige me much. I am well and hope that these few lines will find you the same please answer this as soon as possible for I think that I well get my pay in a day or two.

No more at present but remain yours
Respectfully from C. M. Gano to Henry Hill

February 7, 1862

[continues on same stationery]

Camp Jefferson. Ky
February the 7

Dear brother,

I received your kind and welcome letter and was glad to hear that you and father has been so good to Harriet. That does me some good. Now Henry I will tell you that I have no news to write to you but I must say that I would thank you if you will tell father that it would accommodate me if he would not plague Harriet so much. For I am tired of her writing to me so much. She says that it is helping her to her grave and you may think that I don't like to hear it so much. For she has wrote it to me for several times. I feel bad enough without it. I wrote to you what you should write but I don't think that it will be of any use for you to write anything about it for Norten said that he would do all that he could for me. You need not say anything about it to Harriet.

I am well tonight but my heart is full of trouble. I can 't think of anymore to write. You must [forgive me] for not writing more to you. I have been drilling about all day.

So good night, Please write soon. This is from C.M. Gano to
Henry Hill

You must excuse my poor writing and spelling and mistakes.

February 10, 1862

Murfreesboro, Tennessee
Feb. the 10th 1862

Dear Brother,

I take my pen to answe[r] your kind letters that come to hand yesterday. I was very glad to hear from you and to hear that you was all well. I am not very well now. But I hope that it will not last long. I hope that when these few lines reaches you that they may find you all well. There is nothing as good as good health. It is hard to be sick here. The most of the boys are well.

Guy is in the Company. His head is getting almost well. I think that he will get well it he takes good care of him self. I was glad to hear that you have had a protracted meeting in your schoolhouse and have done some good. I hope that it will last sometime. Encourage those that have started. Do all for them that you can. I wish that I could be there but not so. I am far off and must stay.

I think that we will have another battle soon. Some says that we will not but I think we will. As time is short I must write a short letter. Please write and tell me how things look on the old [place?] where I used to live in the woods. I have no news to write to you this time. We get our pay tomorrow. You must forgive me for not writing more this time. You must write often. I will close by saying good bye.

From your brother C. M. Gano to Henry Hill. I send my
love to all of you. Direct as before.

February 20, 1862

Camp Jefferson. Hart Co. Ky
February the 20th 1862

Dear brother,

I take my pen in hand to tell you that I am well today and hope that these few lines will find you the same. I am sorry to say that I have not got a letter from home for two weeks. The last letter that I got from that [illegible] said that Harriet was failing fast. I want you to write as soon as you get this letter and let me know how it is and if it is so you must put the best side out to her for I begin to think that it is as I told mother before I left home that I thought that Harriet would not live long and if we had stayed in the woods she would not lived on till this time and if I had stayed at home we would been in the woods yet or in the grave. It has turned out just as you said, that it would be the best thing that I could do would be to go to war. It has been the best thing that I could do for I have gained my health. Oh what a good thing it is to have good health for it has been so long since that I have had my health until now that I know how to be thankful for it. I wish that you could see me and see how healthy I do look and I feel as good as I look. Oh that Harriet was as well as I be. But I do hope that she will get well again but I fear that she will not get well again. Now Henry, I don't think that it is of any use for me to write to you about the war for I suppose that you get all of the news before our letters reach you from here. But we think that the war is all most over.

No more at present. Give my love to all and take a good share to your self. Please write as soon as you get this.

Direct as before to the 21 Regiment Bowling Green, Ky

February 22, 1862

February the 22 [1862]

Dear brother,

I take my pen in hand to inform you that I am well today and do hope that these few lines will find you all the same. We hear good news from the papers. They state that the war is almost over and we all think that it is so. I hope that it is so. We have had orders to go to the regiment but we cannot get any teams to go with and I don't know how soon we will go. It may be sometime before we go.

I said that you should direct to Bowling Green but you may direct to Bacon Creek., Hart Co. in care of Capt. S. S. Canfield, Commander of Post and I will get it. I want you to write as soon as you get this. Please don't read this to Harriet.

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