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Vadae G. Meekison Collection - MS 211

Vadae Meekison Correspondence - 1913

January 1913

January 14, 1913

January 14, 1913.

Mrs. Vadae G. Meekison,
755 Wellton Street,
Napoleon, Ohio.

My dear Mrs. Meekison:-

Just a line to thank you for your very satisfactory letter, dated Jan. 3, which must have been long delayed in mailing since I received it only day before yesterday.

You did splendidly to carry Napoleon. We heard a great deal about the obstacles against which you had to work in Napoleon and in the county.

Surely, with as much woman suffrage sentiment as your enrolment indicates we ought to be able to organize permanently in Napoleon. Please keep us in mine and just as soon as the time seems right for an organization meeting, write3 us and we will co-operate with you. We are suggesting that the best way to begin organizing for the next campaign is to have small meetings, that is parlor meetings, of persons already interested and have such meetings addressed by one of our State officers. In this way, a band is established between the State and the various communities and a better understanding is established than can be established by correspondence. We all appreciate the splendid work you did during the campaign and we know that you are ready to go right on with it.

If you do not take the Woman's Journal, please send for a [new page]

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copy of the December 28th issue, which issue contained the plan of work adopted at our State Convention in Columbus.

Again thanking you for your letter, I am
Very cordially yours,
Elizabeth J Hauser
EJH*R

[postscript] Miss Allen told me about the baby and how she went with you to night meetings. I'd love to see her! E.J.H.

January 14, 1913

Jan. 14, 1913.

Dear Friend:

To Ohio belongs the distinction of having polled more votes in favor of woman suffrage - by some tens of thousands - than have ever been cast for the proposition in any other state. Approximately a quarter of a million men voted "Yes" on the woman suffrage amendment at the special election September 3, 1912. With such backing, the woman of the state would be remiss indeed if they should relax their efforts to secure "that right protective of all other rights" - the ballot. And yet it is not "rights" with which we are concerned, but rather the opportunity to do our duty.

No intelligent and conscientious citizen can be indifferent to the social problems of our times. Pure food laws, contagious disease acts, building codes, the water supply, the cost of living, child labor, the white slave traffic, the enactment and administration of laws relating to public schools, to gamblers, to the liquor business - all of these are matters of health and morals and everyone of them intimately affects the lives of men, women and children. Every one of these matters, too, is within the realm of politics. Too live up to the responsibilities which nature and society have forced upon them, women must be elevated to citizenship. They must be given the power to perform their duties.

The campaign for woman suffrage in Ohio must go on. The question will be probably submitted again to the voters in 1914. No officer in the Ohio Woman Suffrage Association is salaried; practically all the service is voluntary; but it takes money to buy literature and postage stamps and to send speakers into the field.

Will you not help in this work? Will you not pledge $1.00 a month for one year or two years to the State Treasury? If you cannot afford a dollar, will you not give fifty cents per month or twenty-give cents per month? Fill in the enclosed card and return it to me. Remember that every penny counts. Give whatever you can, and get such satisfaction as may be had only by helping in a great fundamental social movement.

Yours faithfully,
Harriet Taylor Upton
EJH.BJ

February 1913

February 11, 1913

Feb. 11, 1913.

Mrs. Vadae Meekison,
Napoleon, Ohio.

My dear Mrs. Meekison:-

To Ohio belongs the distinction of having polled more votes in favor of woman suffrage - by some tens of thousands - than have ever been cast for the proposition in any other state. Approximately a quarter of a million men voted "Yes" on the woman suffrage amendment at the special election September 3, 1912. With such backing, the women of the State would be remiss indeed if they should relax their efforts to secure "that right protective of all other rights" - the ballot. And yet it is not "rights" with which we are concerned, but rather the opportunity to do our duty.

No intelligent and conscientious citizen can be indifferent to the social problems of our times. Pure food laws, contagious disease acts, building codes, the water supply, the cost of living, child labor, the white slave traffic, the enactment and administration of laws relating to public schools, to gamblers, to the liquor business - all of these are matters of health and morals and everyone of them intimately affects the lives of men, women and children. Every one of these matters, too, is within the realm of politics. Too live up to the responsibilities which nature and society have forced upon them, women must be elevated to citizenship. They must be given the power to perform their duties.

The campaign for woman suffrage in Ohio must go on. The question will be probably submitted again to the voters in 1914. No officer in the Ohio Woman Suffrage Association is salaried; practically all the service is voluntary; but it takes money to buy literature and postage stamps and to send speakers into the field.

We have found exactly the right chairman for our State Finance Committee in the person of Miss Mary Graham Rice of Norwalk, but she cannot succeed in her efforts to raise funds without the active co-operation of the suffragists in the various counties. We want a member of the Finance Committee in every one of our eighty-eight counties whose duty it shall be to solicit contributions for the State Treasury in her own county. We want five hundred pledges of one dollar per month, for one year. Many persons who will not give ten dollars or twelve dollars at one time will give a dollar a motnh for a year. Those who cannot afford a dollar may give 50 cents of 25 cents a month. With so many campaigns in prospect it is certain that Ohio cannot this time expect as much financial aid from outside the State as it received last time. We shall have to raise the money for our own campaign.

Will you not help in two ways: - one, by recommending some one in your county to go on the Finance Committee; two, by making such a contribution as you may be able to make? Every dollar contributed to the Ohio Woman Suffrage Association will be used for definite constructive work. Indeed, every penny counts, and remember that "he who gives quickly gives twice."

Bespeaking the favor of a prompt reply, I am
Yours faithfully,
Harriet Taylor Upton
EJH.BJ

March 1913

March 17, 1913

March 17, 1913.

Mrs. Vadae G. Meekison,
755 Wilsten St.
Napoleon, Ohio.

My dear Mrs. Meekison:-

Your note dated March 3rd, but envelope post marked March 15th at hand. I think therefore you wrote March 13th. I was so glad to hear from you. I am sorry to say that there is no prospect of my being in Toledo in the near or distant future. I should like so much to meet you personally and to have an opportunity to talk over matters with you. I am wondering however if our Vice President, Mrs. Steinem, would not be extremely helpful to you in discussing such work in your own county. Mrs. Steinem's address you will find at the head of this sheet and the Toledo Suffragists maintain Headquarters somewhere down town. They have lately moved and I fear we have not the correct address here. I am writing to Mrs. Steinem and asking her to drop you a line giving you the address of the Headquarters so that yo umay call there when you are in Toledo March 22nd.

I am so sorry to know the baby broke her arm. What a dreadful thing that was! Still babies arms grow again and she will probably be none the worse for it in the long run.

[end of letter - no signature]

April 1913

April 17, 1913

April 17, 1913.

Dear Friend:-

Mrs. Bachman, our state auditor, writes that Gov. Cox addressed the Columbus Federation of Women's clubs recently and came so near endorsing suffrage that the speech might virtually be taken as an endorsement. Now it is very important that we should win Gov. Cox, and the sooner we can get him to ally himself with us the better. Extreme care will have to be taken, however, in trying to bring this about. The Governor has certainly won the respect and admiration of a majority of the citizens of the state by his very efficient management of affairs during the recent floor. The suffragists in many towns have assisted in the relief work, and in some towns where no local relief was needed they gave money and send supplies to the flooded districts. For instance, in Canton the Woman Suffrage Party gave the entire contents of its treasury, fifty dollars, to the relief fund; in Cleveland, the Woman Suffrage Party donated and made 1400 children's garments and sent them out through the Red Cross Society. The suffragists responded nobly to the Governor's call for help and he ought to be feeling rather kindly towards us. Now would it not be a good thing to write the Governor a letter and tell him how much you, individually, or the women of your town, or the women of your suffrage organization , appreciate the able [new page]

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manner in which he rose to the emergency? I shall write him such a letter and am sending a like request to a f ew picked women through-out the state. We must be careful not to have it seem like a concerted plan. If you write on a suffrage letterhead it will not be necessary to mention suffrage. If you write as an individual, you can manage somehow to bring in a word showing that you are a suffragist.

Miss Anthony always contended that women should be enfranchised by congressional action. Now that there is so much more sentiment than there ever has been before, the work with Congress seems more likely to produce this result. Two-thirds of the states, through their legislatures, must ratify a constitutional amendment to make it effective. Upon first thought, it may seem easy to secure ratifiication from a legislature, compared to securing a majority of 1,200,000 votes, which is the number we shall have to secure in Ohio in order to get suffrage by popular vote. But the task would not be easy for the enemy would be very adtive in the legislature. For the present we will say nothing about this for we do not want any information of our plans to get out before we are ready to go to work definitely on this particular line. Also, as this legislature is to adjourn April 18th it is too late to do anything now. I am explaining this so that you will understand why we should secure the endorsement of the Governor now if such a thing be possible. I have never known a man, or women either for that matter, who was not more amenable to praise than to criticism and nagging. Let us try therefore to "get" Gov. Cox and let us write these letters of commendation about the floor as a step towards accomplishing that result. Please report ot me.

With best wishes.
Yours most cordially,
Harriet Taylor Upton
EJH.BJ

June 1913

June 7, 1913

June 7, 1913.

Mrs. Vadae G. Meekison,
Wallston St.
Napoleon, Ohio.

My dear Mrs. Meekison:-

It is such a long time since I have heard from you and I am wondering what is going on in Napoleon. Did you go to Toledo as expected and did you see Mrs. Steinem? I infer that you did not or Mrs. Steinem, wold have reported it to us. Mrs. Steinem sailed for Europe May 27th and will attend the International woman suffrage meeting at Budapest June 16 to 23.

Please write me and tell me how you are and what the prospects are for getting started in Napoleon. You will receive a copy of Mrs. Upton's recommendations from the Executive Committee through the medium of Everywoman. I do not know whether any of these recommendations can be put into execution in Napoleon.

I do want to hear from you to know how things are with you personally and what the outlook is.

With best wishes,
Yours most sincerely,
Elizabeth J. Hauser
EJH.J

July 1913

July 11, 1913

July 11, 1913.

Mrs. Vadae Meekison,
Napoleon, Ohio.

My dear Mrs. Meekison:-

You know of the effort which we made last winter with the Farmer's Instittutes and will recall that as a result of that effort we gfot resolutions endorsing woman suffrage from one hundred Farmers' Institutes representing fifty-three counties. Now after a persistent effort I have succeeded in getting a directory of the State Grand and we are starting out on this same kind of a crusade among the Granges. Since the National and State Granges have repeatedly endorsed woman suffrage it seems to me that it ought to be compartively easy for us to get local granges to follow suit. I know of nothing which would stir up our question among the farmers more effectually than to introduce it into every grange in every county in the State. I find that in Napoleon there are two subordinare granges and on a separate sheet I am enclosing the names of the officers of these. I enclose also a suggested resolution and a leaflet, copies of which the State Association is ready to furnish you in such quantities as you may desire for distribution in connection with this work. Will it be [new page]

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possible for you to undertake to secure resolutions from these two Henry County Granges?

Miss Hauser and I have been hoping for some time to hear from you. It is a long time since we have had a letter and we are wanting very much to hear that somehting has been done toward organizing at least a committee in Napoleon or somewhere in Henry County. Our initiative petition will be ready for circulation September first and we do hope that by that time we shall have a committee ready to take up the work of circulating it in every single county in the State.

Do let us have a line from you and believe me with sincere appreciation of the work which you did last year,

Yours most cordially,
Harriet Taylor Upton
EJH-R

July 22, 1913

July 22, 1913.

Mrs. Vadae G. Meekison
Napoleon, Ohio

My dear Mrs. Meekison:-

Your splendid letter of July 20th at hand. It is so good to hear from you and very gratifying to know that, with all you have to do, you have managed to speak for suffrage here and there. I think you are quite right in believing that the work in your county will count for most among the farmers. I am so glad that you are able to undertake this work with the Granges.

Your suggestion that the farm women ought to have something simple yet comprehensive and broad to study is exactly right. This suffests to me that there are now a lot of clubs throughout the state of farmer's wives. These clubs are studying civics. The Ohio Farmer is outlining the program. The September program is to be a suffrage program in charge. Now would not the country women be more apt to be interested in a program or in a number of programs suggested to them through the Ohio Farmer than suggested directly from us? I really believe they would. If you agree with me write to Mrs. C.W. Foulk, 384 King Ave., Columbus, Ohio, [new page]

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and ask her for her outline of programs on suffrage for the farmers' wives clubs. In addition I will enclose a few suggestions which may be helpful and they may not. It is so difficult to know just what will help most.

Miss Edith Weld Peck of Cincinnati who has been doing wonderful organization work for the State Association, all voluntary of course, is presently coming into this northern part of the state. She will be in Putnam county pretty soon and I am writing her and suggesting that she run into Napoleon some day to see you. She has had a great deal of experience, is very successful in organizing, and a talk her would do you good I am sure.

Miss Hauser sends her love to you and says to tell you that she is still expecting to see you somewhere sometime and at a no very distant time either.

With best wishes and profound appreciation of the splendid work you are doing in so many directions, I am,

Very cordially yours,
Harriet Taylor Upton
EJH.J
Will send the program suggestions within a few days.

October 1913

October 24, 1913

Oct. 24, 1913.

Mrs. Vadae G. Meekison,
Napoleon, Ohio.

Dear Mrs. Meekison:-

Our initiative petition has been ready for sometime but both Miss Hauser and I have been so much in the field that it ihas been impossible to get at the correspondence earlier. I am writing now to tell you that the petition is ready. We shall have to secure approximately 150,000 names in the state of which we want 740 to come from Henry County. I know this is a small number to put up to a large and populous county and we shall be glad of every name in addition to the 740 which we can secure there abut we shall be satisfied with the 740. The petitions are ruled to accommodate 100 names each but of course we had plenty printed so that no person who starts out with one need feel that she must get 100 names. That is to say, that any person can turn in a petition after securing as many names as possible no matter how far short of one hundred the number may be. Let me know please how many petitions you want and when I shall send them to you.

The state Convention is to be held in Cincinnati November 18 and 19. I wish you could attend but I fear that is too far away for you. Fuller particulars concerning it will be sent you later. The Call has been held up waiting for certain information about the speakers who have been slow in replying to letters.

With best wishes,
Yours most cordially,
Harriet Taylor Upton
EJH.J

November 1913

November 6, 1913

Nov. 6, 1913.

Mrs. Vadae G. Meekison,
Napoleon, Ohio.

My dear Mrs. Meekison:-

Your letter of the 3rd at hand. It interests me greatly. How sorry I am that I did not notify you that I was to be in Defiance. That visit came along with so many other things that it really got crowded out of my mind because the others seemed to me so much more important.

I note that you want the initiative petitions right away and that you think you better have "quite a bunch". You can have just as many as you want. By this same mail we will send you fifteen, numbered from 901 to 915 inclusive. If you want more later let us know.

I am perfectly delighted at your news about the school election. You did not give me the name of your woman candidate but I shall make an item for Everywoman just the same. By the way, do you not get Everywoman? If you do you should have known of my visit to Defiance, and if you do not you ought to take it. It is weekly, only fifty cents a year, and gives the news of the suffrage movement in the state as nothing else does. It is published at 79 E. Spring St., Columbus.

With best wishes,
Yours faithfully
Harriet Taylor Upton
EJH.J

Mrs Hildred sends me one of your sample ballots so I have the name of your woman board member. Also, Mrs H. says 50 petitions are needed 50 petitions are needed, so I'll send 35 to her to make out the 50. I hope you can get at least 1000 signatures.

December 1913

December 3, 1913

Dec. 3, 1913.

Mrs. Vadae G. Meekison,
Napoleon, Ohio.

Dear Mrs. Meekison:-

I cannot remember whether in writing to you about the petitions we told you that the Executive Committee of the State had voted to recommend to all persons circulating the petitions that they keep copies of the names received. You will immediately see the value of this. At first it looks like a big task but it narrows itself down to having each person who circulates keep a a copy of the names on her particular petition and then turn them over to the person who has charge for the county so it really amounts to very little work for any one person. It will be fine for each county to have on file the names of the men who have signed the initiative petitions so that they can remind them by post card or otherwise not to forget to vote for the amendment when it is submitted.

With best wishes, I am,
Cordially yours,
Elizabeth J. Hauser
EJH.J

December 4, 1913

Warren, Ohio, Dec. 4, 1913.

Dear friend:-

The first of our initative petitions have been returned and looking over I find that signers in giving date of a signature, have neglected to put in the year. This is doubtless due to the fact that the petition is ruled for month and day, but not for year. Please see that all signers to petition in your possession do indicate 1913 or 1914, as the case may be, in filling in the petition. All petitions sent out from now on will include a special space for the year.

I enclose self-addressed postal card. Please use it to let me know you have received this letter and will comply with its request.

Yours sincerely,
Harriet Taylor Upton
President O.W.S. Assn.


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MS 211 - Vadae G. Meekison Collection Introduction | Transcript List
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