Center for Archival Collections

Reference Services | Manuscripts by Subject | CAC Homepage

Vadae G. Meekison Collection - MS 211

Vadae Meekison Correspondence - 1914

March 1914

March 2, 1914

March 2, 1914.

Mrs. Vadae G. Meekison,
Napoleon,
Ohio.

Dear Mrs. Meekison:-

We have at last secured from the Legislative Committee and the Secretary of State, prepared heads of our new petitions, and they went to the printer several days ago. We have been hoping all the time that we might be able to use the old ones but it is now settled and we cannot. I am writing to you to return the petitions which you have. Whether they have been filled or not, it does not matter. We want to recall all of the old ones.

Of course, this delay has been trying and in cases where people have secured a number of names, it seems terrible but, on the other hand, we have some advantages. With this new law which the extra session of the legislature passed, we will be much better off in the long run than we were under the old arrangements.

A goodly number of the people who circulated the petitions did not stand by our suggestions which we went out and allowed people to sign with pencil, did not insist upon their giving their precinct, etc., and so a number of them would have been void.

Knowing that you want to do all that you possibly can to enfranchise women and knowing that this is a time that we can accomplish it if we all work, I know that you will be glad to lend a hand with this second circulation.

Cordially yours,
Harriet Taylor Upton
HTU.J

April 1914

April 20, 1914

April 20, 1914.

Mrs. Vadae Meekison,
Napoleon, Ohio.

Dear Mrs. Meekison:-

Have you a picture of yourself and your children. If so send it to me right away.

So glad you came to the meeting. I know you had a good time yourself and you added quite a bit to the pleasure of all of us and to the success of the luncheon.

We are just swamped with work.
Cordially yours,
Harriet Taylor Upton
HTU.B

May 1914

May 5, 1914

May 5, 1914.

Mrs. Vadae G. Meekison,
Napoleon, O.

Dear Mrs. Meekison:

I am just home from the woman suffrage parade in Boston. I have read carefully "The sun do move and the earth am square". It was very funny.

Goodness, wasn't it fine about having the Henry County Sunday School Association endorse suffrage? Just think, four or five thousand members!

Can you give me the names of the officers of the Henry County Sunday School Association?

Lovingly Yours,
Harriet Taylor Upton
HTU/MCS.

June 1914

June 15, 1914

June 15, 1914.

Mrs. Vadae G. Meekison,
755 Welsted St.,
Napoleon, Ohio.

Dear Mrs. Meekison:-

The minute your letter came I sent you ten petitions. You will probably get them before you get this.

I am glad to have you say you are working hard on the petitions. I would be awfully disappointed if Napoleon would not get its quota.

Am glad to know that David is well and that all is right with you.

Hastily but cordially,
Harriet Taylor Upton
HTU.B

June 24, 1914

Warren, Ohio, June 24, 1914.

Dear Friend:-

The amazing report comes this morning from one of our field workers that in a certain section of the State the impression that it is not necessary for other counties to do any work. Nothing could be farther from the truth. Cleveland has done exceedingly well. That county will turn its ten percent and a fine surplus besides, but the success of this petition depends upon the work done in every count. Remember we must have 10% of the entire vote of the State. This means in actual figures 103,764 names and unless we have several thousand surplus to make up for names which are sure to be thrown out our petition will fail. To be defeeated at the polls would be a bitter disappointment, but to fail to get sufficient signatures to the petition would be a disgrace.

Men are willing to sign; are women unwilling to ask them? A short time only remains until we shall know our fate. We have not time for a long pull, but unless we make a strong pull and a pull altogether we shall fail. Please try hard. If YOU have not done your full duty, if YOUR COUNTY has not turned in its quota, work these last two weeks as you never worked before, for the honor of your county in particular and the great cause of equal suffrage in general. Would you be willing ot have it said that your county defeated the initiative petition? Certainly not.

To those who have worked devotedly and have turned in the assignment from their counties, it is now necessary for us to appeal for a little further service. Every single name counts.

#2.

A number of methods have been employed with success and I recommend them to you. In county seat towns workers are urged to go to the court houses and ask men to sign who are there to pay their taxes. The "Taxation with representation is tyranny" argument could not be presented at a more opportune time than right now when taxes are being collected at the county treasurer's office.

In one city the president of a bank invited the canvassers to spend Saturday morning at his bank soliciting signatures. Of course this method should be employed only where permission can be secured.

In other cities women have stood on the streets as early as five a.m. securing scores of signatures from men on their way to their work; they have also appealed to the men in the parks, and to those coming out of pictures shows. Bible classes and churches have been canvassed. It seems that it works better to have women visit churches other than the one they usually attend.

Many of the big industrial plants in the Mahoning valley are vising the circulators permission to canvass in their plants, stipulating, however, that but one woman make the canvass. Ususally someone from the factory is delegated to go with her through the various departments. No manufacturing plant should be neglected as working men are uniformly friendly.

Another State has recommended securing a place to take signatures in a popular store and advertising that signatures would be received there. In the State in which this was tried the first store was soon crowded and several other merchants asked to have petitions placed in their store.

#3.

As soon as you receive this send in any completed petitions that you have. If your petitions are not finished, send us word how many signatures you have to date. This will help immensely. Hurry the work, do not wait too long. Many of the petitions have to go back for corrections and all this consumes precious time. We have grudgingly extended the time on the petitions to July 1, being enabled to do so by a recent generous ruling by the Secretary of State and now because the need is so great I am giving you until July 7th to finish your petitions and return them to me. This will give you two additional Saturday and Sundays, the most fruitful days in the week for work.

If we get our petitions we will win and our hardest work will be over. If we get the petitions, we shall be able to get money to finance the campaign. If we carry Ohio in 1914, New York will follow in 1915. This is the vital moment and Ohio is the storm center of the movement at this time. We dare not fail.

Write me immediately upon receipt of this so that I may know what you are doing.

With best wishes,
Yours faithfully,
Harriet Taylor Upton

June 27, 1914

June 27, 1914.

Mrs. Vadae G. Meekison,
Napoleon, Ohio.

Dear Mrs. Meekison:

I found your letter upon my return from Cleveland yesterday where I had spent eighteen or twenty hours. I am glad my letter answered yours in advance, otherwise you would have been delayed in hearing from me.

Henry county must get its quota and I am glad to have you say you think it is going to.

Your speech to the W.C.T.U. women was all right.

Yes, you are right, if we do not get our petitions, it is because of the diffidence and indifference of women. Men are now ready everywhere to sign up.

Of course you could not accomplish very much in this direction and have your children to look after, but if every one with two children did as much as you, we could have easy gotten out quota.

Why are you getting names on the W.C.T. U. petitions when you have one of our own? It really doesn't matter where we get them, but I only wondered if you had a reason.

Cordially yours,
Harriet Taylor Upton
HTU/MCS.

July 1914

July 6, 1914

July 6 1914.

Mrs. Vadae Meekison,
Napoleon, Ohio.

Dear Mrs. Meekison:

Am so glad to know that Henry county will have its quota and more. Send on the petitions as soon as you can, because sometimes there are errors to correct or additions to be made or information to get and time is short now.

Cordially yours,
Harriet Taylor Upton
HTu-T.

July 10, 1914

July 10, 1914.

Mrs. Vadae Meekison,
Welsted St.,
Napoleon, Ohio.

Dear Mrs. Meekison:-

I am wondering if you have any petitions which have not been turned in to headquarters. If you have and if they are filled and finished do send them along. We have not Henry county's 10% in hand although we know the names have been gotten. Of course I am anxious to mark it up safe on our list and put a red ring on the map. As fast as a county has gotten its 10% I have marked it down on the map on our wall with a red pencil mark and Henry county is surrounded by red rings and yet I cannot ring it. So hoping you will help clean up that corner soon, won't you?

Cordially yours,
Harriet Taylor Upton
Your letter came since I dictated this.
I have wondered why you sent our petitions to the W.C.T.U. headquarters.

July 11, 1914

July 11, 1914.

Mrs. Vadae Meekison,
Napoleon, Ohio.

Dear Mrs. Meekison:-

Your letter with petitions received. I have read it carefully. Think the result in your county is splendid. Hope you will all be ready for the work for the fall campaign.

Kiss the babies for me.

Have not the time nor the strength nor the mind to write another work.

Lovingly yours,
Harriet Taylor Upton
HTU/MHD

July 20, 1914

July 20 1914.

Mrs. Vadae Meekison,
Napoleon, O.

Dear Mrs. Meekison:

Your letter of July 17th here. Tell Mr. Durham that he need not worry about his name being on two petitions, I will take it off one of them. We have kept such a perfect record of our petitions that it will be no trouble to find it.

Glad things are going well in Napoleon and in the county.

Cordially yours,
Harriet Taylor Upton
HTU-T.

July 20, 1914

Warren, Ohio. July 20, 1914.

Dear Friend:-

I am very anxious to meet personally at Columbus all people who have circulated petitions and I hope you will come to see me at Hotel Hartman on Thursday the 30th. I have a number of matters to attend to which will occupy most of the morning but I will be in the parlor from one o'clock until three. It might help you, it wil help me and surely will help the campaign if we can see each other.

Yours faithfully,
Harriet Taylor Upton
HTU/B

August 1914

August 11, 1914

Warren, Ohio, Aug. 11, 1914.

Dear Friend:-

A few days ago I received a letter which reads as follows:

July 30th, 1914.

"I am sending you by American Express a diamond solitaire ring. It is the only jewel I possess. If I had money I would send that and keep this for association's sake; but I have none so I send you what I can. I want Ohio to win equal suffrage this fall more than anything else I know. I might far better part with this jewel than that mothers should part with their babes, children with their youth, young people with their virtue and women with their self-respect, all because our government which controls everything in our daily lives through politics, is in the hands of greedy, unscrupulous politicians instead of in the hands of the people - among whom I class mothers.

With strong hopes for your success I sign myself,
A lover of justice and a believer in my sex."

The ring has a very clear and beautiful white diamond setting; it is for a very slender finger. It was probably bought for a bride. I want to make an effort to trace the donor through the express company and return it to her with the thanks of Ohio women. I feel I have no right to do that, however, unless I can assure her that her gift has been the means of putting $150.00 into our treasury. Miss Hauser and I will each give one dollar towards suach a fund, and we are asking a similar contribution from our State Executive Committee. Will you be one of the remaining 135 to give one dollar each? If you cannot give a dollar, you can get some friend to give one.

Let us gather one hundred and fifty dollars in this way, each giving her dollar in a spirit of gratitude to our unknown benefactor and with the thought of VICTORY in mind,

Yours faithfully,
Harriet Taylor Upton
President Ohio Woman Suffrage Association.

August 21, 1914

August 21, 1914.

Mrs. Vadae G. Meekison,
Napoleon, Ohio.

Dear Mrs. Meekison:-

Enclosed find receipt for $5.00. We will credit to the diamond ring fund as you ask us to do. Your letter was very interesting. It was a nice mix up of David's teeth and anti suffragists and all that. You are a great girl.

I myself would like to know how much of Graves salary is paid by women but I guess we never will.

Cordially yours,
Harriet Taylor Upton
HTU.B


To see images of original correspondence, search for "Meekison" on Ohio Memory

MS 211 - Vadae G. Meekison Collection Introduction | Transcript List
Manuscripts by SubjectWomen's Studies Collections