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Marilyn Clay Family Papers - MS 258

James D. Fisher Correspondence - 1863

January 10, 1863

New Bern, North Carolina
January 10, 1863

Dear Wife:

I now take the pleasure of writing to you to let you know that I am well and hope this may find you the same. I received your letter and was glad to hear from home once more, though it was a long time between letters. But when come to find that you had not got my last letters, I did not think so much of it. I answered your letter and father's that you sent to me. I got the stamps that was sent and was glad of them. I am astonished to think that you have not got my last letter. We spent New Year's on the salt water. We landed here this Monday at New Bern in North Carolina.

This paper is a considerable mussed up but we have to use it here. I would like to know how much Father gave for that place that you said he bought. If you want my money you had better write to the old man Fisher in Fulton. He owes me $4 that he said he would send to you when he killed his hogs. We expect to get our pay before a great while. I have nothing more to write at present. Write soon and often, your affectionate husband,

James D. Fisher

Tell Nate to write to us and let us know what he is a doing. We have wrote to him but never got an answer.

February 11, 1863

Port Royal, South Carolina
Camped on the Isle of St. Helena
February 11, 1863

Dear Wife:

I will now take the pleasure of writing to you to let you know that I am well and hope these few lines may find you all the same. I have written 3 letters to you since I have had a letter from you. We are now in South Carolina where it is as warm as it is there in the summer. We went out and got all the oranges we could carry. They have planted peas here and are getting ready to plant corn. We was on the ocean from the 23rd of January to the 6th of February. Lemons, oranges, figs, and all such things grow here. Tell Nate to send us some broken bank money if he can get it for it is just as good to us as the best. Write and tell us what the news is there. We don't hear anything here. We can't as much as get a letter let alone papers. We don't know what is going on at all. We would like to hear that the war is about to close for we are getting about tired of soldiering. If you have a chance to send that note out to Fulton that is against Jim Boros, send it out for it is due in March.

We are expecting our pay every day. Nothing more at present. Excuse my bad writing I have no chance to write. Write soon and often.

James D. Fisher
Co. F, 67th Regt., O.V.I.
Port Royal, S.C.

February 15, 1863

Port Royal, South Carolina
February 15, 1863

My Dear Wife:

All though far from you but not forgotten yet, I have sat down once more to write a few lines to you to inform you that I am well at this present time and hope with all of my heart that these few lines will find you and the children enjoying the same health, and also to let you know that I received a letter from you yesterday and I was very glad to hear from you and it found me well and tell Erin that his Pa felt very bad to think his boy had thought that he had forgotten him. But I have not forgotten him nor any of the rest of the children and tell Levi that I will send him a little conch and I want him to keep it until I come home. And you wrote to me that you was a going to be keeping house and that you was a going to have you a cow and I thought that if Nathan was a going out there you had better give him that note of Jim Boro's and that will get you a cow. And I must tell you that I am now on what's called the Island of St. Helena and I must tell you what a good time we had a eating oranges (?). There is oranges growing on this place wild. Write as soon as you get this and write as often as you can and not wait for me. This from your husband,

James D. Fisher

February 22, 1863

Port Royal, South Carolina
Camped on the Isle of St. Helena
February 22, 1863

Dear Wife:

It is with pleasure that I now write to you to let you know that I am well and hope these few lines will find you the same. I had a letter wrote to you last Sunday and I thought that I would write another letter to you today. I got John Fisher to write the other letter and today he's writing for me. I thought that I would tell you that I think you had better mosie down to Father's for you can get your cows pastured and it won't cost anything. I have been rather unwell but I am better. I have had the dysentery. Tell Irwing to be a good boy and go to school. If he does, I will get him something nice. Tell Janey that I think of her every day. I have nothing more to say, so I will close. Write soon, goodbye.

James D. Fisher
Co. F, 67th Regt., O.V.I.
Port Royal, South Carolina

Write and let us know all the news for we don't hear anything here of any account. We hear some very heavy cannon rolling sometimes but we have been lucky enough to escape being in any battle. Good bye. Write soon.

March 8, 1863

Port Royal, South Carolina
Isle of St. Helena
March 8, 1863

Dear Wife:

I now take the pleasure of writing to you once more to let you know that I am in good health and hope these few lines will find you all the same. We are still camped on the Island of St. Helena and we don't know how much longer we will stay here but we don't expect to stay a great while. We think they are making preparations to make an attack on Charleston though we do not know for certain. I want you to write and me how you are getting along and whether you furnish you own board or how you do manage the thing. If you could get a couple of cows and can get a place to keep them without it costing too much you had better get them. I would like you to write often. Write every week for I don't get a letter once a month. It would be a great comfort to me to get a letter from home every week. I would write oftener if I could write but I can't write and I hate to bother other folks. When you write, send a few stamps.

Now I will tell you a little about the soldiers and about this island. We see a great many things to encourage us here. It is pleasant to look upon the beautiful scenes around us on this island. It is pleasant to see the fruit trees all in full bloom at this season of the year and to pluck the beautiful orange from the tree upon which it grows. It is pleasant to look before us and see the great river filled with vessels and steamboats and gunboats, all working in the same cause that we are. It is pleasant to here the sharp music of the fife and the beating of the drums and the charming music of the brass bands. It is pleasant to look upon all these scenes but to think what it is for and how many noble lives has been lost in this cause and we do not know how many more may be before it is settled. But we hope and pray that there will not be many more if any.

I hope that the day will soon come that we may all return safe home to our friends to enjoy once more happy meetings and never to be called again in such a cause. Nothing more at present. Write as soon as you get this. Good bye.

James D. Fisher
Co. F, 67th Regt., O.V.I.
Port Royal, S.C.

[No Date]

Mrs. Hannah Fisher:

I will write a few lines in this letter to let you know that I am well and have been ever since I left home and hope that I may remain so. Tell Nate that I received a package of envelopes the other day mailed at Rochester but there was more signed to them but I think it must have been Nate's. Tell him if he sent them or whoever sent them I am very much obliged to them. I was just out.

Wesley N. Justice

June 10, 1863

Folly Island, South Carolina
June 10, 1863

My Dearest Son Irving Fisher:

Although distant from you but not forgotten it is with the greatest of pleasure that your pa takes his pen in hand to write you a few lines to you to let you know that your pa is well at this present time and your pa hopes that these few lines will find his little man enjoying the same health. And you pa wants you to be a good boy and stay with your grampa until I come home and your pa is a going to send you little books and I send you some to read and learn by. But until your pa comes home be a good boy and go to school every day when you are well and my little man, pa wants you to get your likeness taken and Jamie's too and pa wants you to have them taken together and send them to me and pa will get his taken as soon as he can. And send it to your pa so must being his writing to a close and pa wants you to write him a letter soon as soon as you get this. And pa sends his love and best respects to all of his little ones and dearest wife, I am a going to send a little book in to your letter and I want you to give it to Ida Jane and tell her that her pa send it to her and dearest wife and I want you to write and let me know whether you get these little books or not and write as soon as you get this and let me know how you are a getting a long. So goodbye, no more for this time. And I would like to have you write me longer letters the next time and write as often as you can and I will be there soon.

This from,
James D. Fisher

June 10, 1863

Folly Island, South Carolina
June 10, 1863

My Dearest Wife:

Although far distant but not forgotten it is with the greatest of pleasure that I take my pen in hand to write you a few lines to you to let you know that I am well at this present time and I hope these few lines will find you and the children all enjoying the same blessings and I must also let you know my dearest wife that I received your very kind letter from you the 5th of June and your letter found me well and your letter was written the 20th of May. I was very glad to hear from you and to hear that you and the children were well at that present time and I hope that these few lines will find you and the children well as it lives me and it will be all right. Dearest wife I must also let you know what is the reason that I did not write you a longer letter the last time. I had to go on picket and had not time but I thought that I would let you know that I send you $45 in money and I sent the money by Mr. Carter and he went home on a furlough some three weeks ago and he said that he would express it from Toledo to you and dearest wife I hope that you will let that $45 dollars out on interest and I want you to get good security for it and write and tell me whether you get it or not and they say that we will get some more in a few days and I must also let you know how we are a getting a long away down south in Dixie. We are a getting along first rate and I must also let you know what kind of houses we have here. We got a load of new tents the other day and have got things set up. It up to the handle and must also let you know dearest wife that I enjoy myself very well as I away down here a away from you and my children but we must trust in God for our protection and safety home again and well all live in hopes that we shall meet again before a great while longer I must also let you know that we haven't got stay but as 6 months and 2 days longer at encrate from today and I would like to have you have your and the childrens' likenesses taken and send them to me by mail and get them taken into a case and I will get mine taken as soon as I can and send it to you and you also have to write me a good many times that you wanted to know what we have to eat and now I will give you a fine description of it. We have fresh beef twice a week and beans and salt beef and pork and sugar and coffee and tea and peas and flour and vinegar and molasses and hard tacks and rice and desperade (dessicated?) potatoes and hominy and candles. But you must understand that we don't eat them. And I must also tell you that Uncle Sam gives us better clothing then we buy at home and nothing to do I am the heaviest I ever was before. I only weigh about 150 pounds and Must bring my writing to a close and I send my love and best respects to all of you so good bye.

This from your husband,
James D. Fisher

June 25, 1863

Folly Island, South Carolina
June 25, 1863

Dear Wife:

It is with all pleasure that I take the opportunity to write you a few lines to let you know that I am well at present. When you received this letter I hope it may find you the same. I received your letter yesterday. I was very glad to hear from you. I thought I would write to you and tell you there is state funds for the women that their men is in the army. It is raised a purpose for them and you may as well have your share of it as everyone else. It is raised by a tax. I pay a tax as well as everyone else if I am in the field. It is hard times for everything is so high. If you can get what is due you, you will get $8 a month. That is more than half as much as I get and it belongs to you. The express agency of each town has it to see to. If you see him and tell him you need I think there will be no trouble getting it. You wanted to know how it came that money was expressed to you. I send it by one of the men that was going home and I thought when he got the Toledo he was detained there so he expressed it from there. He expressed a number of the boys money at the same time. We got pay yesterday and we expect to get pay again the 5th of July. Then I think I can send you $50 more. Write and tell me what you do with the last that I sent you. They have been shelling us for the last four or five days and thank the Lord they hurt no one, only two niggers. They killed two niggers but they would not miss them if they killed more of them. They threw a shell into the picket post last night and it wounded two men. One of them died last night. It is all quiet and still today. The Secesh are deserting very fast. There has been nearly 100 come in our lines this week. They say they are pretty hard up for grub and half rations at that, nothing but meal. One of them said he had not had any coffee for the last 18 months. One of them has a brother here in the 62nd Ohio. Well wife I have not got any more to write this time. You must write often and I will do the same. No more at present so good bye for this time.

James Fisher to Hannah Fisher

You tell the old man Fisher that I will send his letters to Rochester.

July 14, 1863

Morris Island, South Carolina
July 14, 1863

Dear Wife:

I received your much welcomed letter the 10th and it found me well. I have no chance to write here now for we are now on the battlefield. Our men opened on the enemy on the morning of the 10th and drove them out of their breastworks and forts and killed some, took some prisoners and we are now fortifying and getting ready to advance on them as fast as possible. The rebels are a throwing shells over our heads while I am writing this so I shall have to cut it short. I got the childrens' pictures, they look very natural. You need not send yours unless you can send it in a case for they are so apt to get spoiled without. You had better put that money out at 6 per cent unless you can get sheep for a dollar and a half a head. I don't know as you can read this but it is the best I can do at present. This is some paper that I picked up here in the Rebel camp. Nothing more this time so good bye.

Write soon,
J.D. Fisher

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