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Byron Armbruster World War II Papers: Transcripts - MS 984

Byron ArmbrusterĀ Correspondence to Parents, May 1945

May 8, 1945

Germany
8 May '45

Dear Dad and Mother -

So they tell us to-day is VE day. There is no celebrating, as I guess its only on paper, as there is, and still will be some fanatics that will have to be wiped out. Its just another day to me, however I think its another step towards coming home. Tell mother Brinkman she has our geographic location pretty well worked out.

Mother, I'm sorry I couldn't do better but please accept this as a mother's day note. I was so busy, that I have neglected to wire you some flowers. Please forgive me.

We are at present stopping for a short time, in a very pretty part of Germany. Did you ever receive the wooden shoes I sent, plus a few other items?

To-day is a beautiful sunny day, so I'll close and and see if I can get a little suntan.

My Love to you All,
Byron

May 10, 1945

Ausstria
10 May 45

Dear Folks -

I think we have stopped for awhile. To-day finds me in a new country, the twelfth I have visited in my lifetime. This is one of the most beautiful spots I have ever visited, as far as scenery is concerned. Its more like a story book picture. The fighting has ceased and German soldiers seem to be as thick as other soldiers.

If I have to remain away from home, I know of know other place that I would rather be stationed. I share my hotel room with one other fellow, and rooms at the Secor, Niel House or the Desher Wallic has nothing on our room. Its really a beauty.

I'll close and enjoy a little of the beauty that has been absent for so many months.

With Love,
Byron

P.S.
Marcille thanks a million for the picture. Its certainly good of both but what are the two stars for Bert never being out of the States, in Combat duty.

May 14, 1945

Lofer, Austria
14 May '45

Dear Folks -

At long last, I can tell you where I am stationed. At present are stationed here at Lofer, a resort village not far from Berchtesgarden, Hitlers hideout. One of our boys even captured one of his private cars. It is rumored that it may be sent to the States on a band tour.

My office is located in a hotel, where Mrs. Roosevelt stayed while making her last visit here in Austria. It's a unique hotel much like I've seen them pictured in Switzerland. This morning some of the boys drove up in the Alps and got stuck in the snow. Its really warm here in the valley during the day, but the nites are cool. This army of occupation is really something, no more bullets or bombing to sweat out, no it doesn't seem the same, no blackouts or anything. Of course we aren't allowed to associate with the civilians.

I know that the closing of the war in Europe has certainly taken a strain off your minds and mine too.

I have no one but He above to thank for sparing my life, not even a scratch.

Love,
Byron

May 15, 1945

Lofer, Austria
15 May '45

Dear Folks -

Gee this is really something. I hardly know how to act. This army of occupation is O.K. One doesn't have to worry about bullets, bombing, shelling or anything, even if the heinies are still as thick as hops. I hope if Kenny is sent across, it will be to Europe.

Enclosed is a picture of the house in which I live. I live in the corner room on the third floor. It's the choicest room in the house. From our little porch, we overlook the snow capped mountains and a swift, clear, mountain brook rushes past just to the right of the house. Emma would just be in her glory. In fact I don't think its so bad myself. X on the picture, marks my room.

I share it with Cpl. Frick from Evansville, Indiana, who is also in the Supply Section. He's my helper. You know I've been taking Sgt. Bernth's place since he has left (three months now) but I hear he is on his way back. I'll certainly be glad when he gets here. It will give me more of a chance to get out of the office and look around, more. The mountain streams are filled with fish and the boys are having pretty good luck.

Notice the tree which resembles a vine against the house? Its an apple tree. Many trim their trees like that. They are trimed to hugh the walls and not allowed to branch out.

The civilians here, nearly all wear leather, knee pants 3/4 height socks, hats with all type of feathers, belts six to eight, inches wide, cut away jackets and every color under the sun. They remind one of story book people and there homes are just as picturesque. Mother Brinkman would like this. Much like here native country of Switzerland.

Love,
Byron

May 25, 1945

Lofer, Austria
25 May '45

Dear Folks -

This is 10:30 pm and a crowd is gathered in my room for a bull session. We have just finished popping corn.

About all they are talking about is points and what why would be doing tonite if each were home.

I'm sending several pictures. They will be better than me writing a letter. Some aren't very good.

Mother why don't you sell the cows and take it easy? Sell them all if you like.

We have been having rain now for several days.

Steve Franek has sent a rifle to you in my name. Take care of it when it arrives, as he wants it when we get home.

We'll, to much noise so I'll sign off. It sure seems good to have nothing to worry about anymore, once you hit the hay. Everything here is O.K. I could stay here for the duration and like it, as much as I'd like to come home.

Love,
Byron

P.S. I sent that box with wooden shoes, in March. Did it contain any snaps?

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