BOWLING GREEN STATE UNIVERSITY


Higher education in Canada subject of Reddin Symposium

The challenges facing higher education in the United States and Canada are very similar. Canadian responses to those challenges differ markedly, however, and they will be the subject of the 20th annual Reddin Symposium at BGSU.

The symposium will be held from 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday (Jan. 13) in 101B Olscamp Hall.

Three guest speakers will explore the major factors affecting the delivery of post-secondary education in an era of insufficient revenue and increasing costs.

Claire Morris, president and CEO of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada, which represents 89 Canadian public and private universities and colleges, will discuss the state of higher education in Canada and its key challenges.

Neil Gold, provost and academic vice president at the University of Windsor, will discuss provincial aspects of higher education in Ontario and comment on recent funding reform initiatives and regional partnerships. BGSU and the University of Windsor are partners in a Memorandum of Understanding enabling collaboration on research, teaching and outreach.

Chad Gaffield is president of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, a quasi-federal agency that promotes and supports university-based research. He will explore education's contributions to competitiveness and productivity in society.

Although there is no charge to attend the program, reservations are required. To make reservations, contact Barb Berta at the BGSU Canadian Studies Center at 2-2457 or cast@cba.bgsu.edu. Reservations also can be made online at www.cba.bgsu.edu/cast/reddin.html.

The annual Reddin Symposium provides a forum for timely topics about Canada and that nation's relationship to the United States.

This year's symposium is made possible through the generous support of the Reddin family of Bowling Green, the higher education and student affairs department at BGSU, private donations and assistance from the government of Canada.

January 8, 2007