BOWLING GREEN STATE UNIVERSITY


Elaina Williams (right) explains her work on the jumping skills of children to Dr. Devin McAuley, psychology, at the BGSU Research Conference.

Elaina Williams (right) explains her work on the jumping skills of children to Dr. Devin McAuley, psychology, at the BGSU Research Conference.

Faculty, student research celebrated at annual conference

The creative and scholarly accomplishments of faculty and students were on display Nov. 6 at the seventh annual BGSU Research Conference. Poster presentations enabled participants to share their contributions to the production of knowledge, “which is a core mission of the University,” said Dr. Mark Gromko, senior vice provost for academic programs.

“Research is foundational to the purpose of the University just as it is to the lives of faculty,” said Dr. Deanne Snavely, interim vice provost for research and dean of the Graduate College, in welcoming guests to the luncheon.

Sessions throughout the day explored topics such as wind energy and STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) research and teaching. Faculty, graduate and undergraduate student research presentations were included in the poster sessions, displaying a range of studies from kinesiology to biology to art.

Sigma Xi, the scientific honorary, awarded prizes and honorable mention to a number of student participants. Top prize was taken by two undergraduates, who each received $100.

• Elaina Williams, a senior from Youngstown majoring in kinesiology, works with Dr. Stephen Langendorfer. Her study, “Relationships among Jumping Coordination Patterns, Distance and Weight,” involved testing the skill level of children aged 5-13 related to height, weight and distance jumped. The study is part of a larger work aimed at determining whether physical skills developed in childhood correlate to sustained activity levels and healthy weight in adulthood.

• Ellen Wakeley, a senior from Vicksburg, Miss., majoring in biology, asked “What Influences Seed Removal?” as part of her work with Dr. Helen Michaels on understanding the life cycle of blue lupine. The plant is crucial to the endangered Karner blue butterfly, which lives in northwest Ohio’s Oak Openings region.

A number of other undergraduate and graduate students, received honorable mention awards from the committee. All were recognized at a reception at the close of the day, which included “Five Minutes of Fame,” a series of short presentations on their research by four faculty members and two students.

November 10, 2008