BGSU begins semester with focus on black history


BOWLING GREEN, O.—February is officially national Black History Month, but at Bowling Green State University commemorative events will begin in January and continue through mid-March.

Bridging the University and the city, Dr. Jack Taylor, a professor emeritus of ethnic studies, will deliver the keynote address for the city of Bowling Green’s 24th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Tribute on Jan 18. Hosted by the city’s Human Relations Commission, the talk will be held at 1:30 p.m. in the Wood County District Public Library, 251 N. Main St., and will feature musical selections by the Shades of Brown Singers.

Once again, BGSU students, faculty, staff and alumni will make Martin Luther King Jr. Day “a day on, not a day off,” by spending it in service to the community. The University expects nearly 500 participants on Jan. 21 to give about 4,000 combined hours helping a number of Bowling Green and Toledo agencies and organizations. The event is coordinated by the Civic Action Leaders in the Office of Service-Learning.

This year's event will also honor former Undergraduate Student Government President Johnnie Lewis, a student leader at BGSU who passed away in July 2012.

“A Taste of February” on Feb. 1 will kick off the month with the theme "E Pluribis Unum: Out of Many, One." The diversity event celebrates cultural awareness through educational entertainment, food and conversation. Sponsored by the Office of Residence Life, the SMART Program and the Black Graduate Student Organization, the event takes place from 6-8:30 p.m. in the ballroom and is free for BGSU students with ID, $15 for BGSU faculty and staff and $25 for community members. Register online at https://reslife.bgsu.edu/forms/taste-feb.php or contact Ana Brown at acbrown@bgsu.edu.

An annual highlight of Black History Month at the University, the Black Issues Conference will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Feb. 2 in the Bowen-Thompson Student Union’s Lenhart Grand Ballroom. The title of this year’s conference is "The Power of One: Building a Commitment to Constructive Cooperation." Attorney Kathryn A. Williams, an educator and activist, will give the keynote address. The event provides an opportunity to learn about and address key issues that affect the African-American/black community in the U.S. and provides a forum for discussion, dialogue and research presentation. The conference is free for BGSU students with ID, $15 for BGSU faculty and staff, and $25 for community members. Register online at https://reslife.bgsu.edu/forms/taste-feb.php.The conference is sponsored by the Office of Multicultural Affairs and the Black Graduate Student Organization. For more information, contact Sheila Brown at stbrown@bgsu.edu.

The BGSU Festival Series celebrates the Negro spiritual on Feb. 23 when the American Spiritual Ensemble comes to Kobacker Hall in Moore Musical Arts Center. Featuring some of the finest classically trained singers in the United States, the ensemble’s mission is to keep the American Negro spiritual alive. Since its inception by Dr. Everett McCorvey in 1995, its vocalists have thrilled audiences around the world with their dynamic repertoire ranging from spirituals to classical to jazz and Broadway numbers highlighting the black experience.

Tickets range from $12 to $38. For information, visit http://www.bgsu.edu/festivalseries or call 419-372-8171. The series is sponsored by the College of Musical Arts.

Black History events culminate in March with the annual Africana Studies Conference, "Catalysts for Change in the Africana World," on March 15, hosted by the Africana Studies Program, and the 17th annual State of the State Conference on March 21, "Creating an Inclusive Environment for Many Voices," sponsored by the Office of Multicultural Affairs.

For a complete list of events, visit http://www.bgsu.edu/blackhistorymonth/index.html.

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(Posted January 09, 2013 )