Thursday, October 17, 2013  
Diane Nash speaks on civil rights legacy | Learning from pigeons

CIVIL RIGHTS LEADER VISITS TO MARK MARCH ON WASHINGTON ANNIVERSARY

Diane Nash
The civil rights movement was in high gear by the 1960s. Activists all over the country were trying to come up with creative strategies to make progress both politically and culturally.

A group of students in the South came together in 1960 to form the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), which would play a key role in the legendary March on Washington on Aug. 28, 1963, a turning point in the nation's history. Among those founding members was Diane Nash.

In commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, Bowling Green State University's Department of Ethnic Studies welcomes civil rights activist Nash to campus on Oct. 24. She will speak at 6 p.m. in 228 Bowen-Thompson Student Union on "The Movements of the '60s: A Legacy for Today." The event is free and open to the public, with a reception after the presentation.

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Child of Cold War peaks behind torn Iron Curtain - Sentinel-Tribune
Kindergartner Ella Hertzfeld listens to the heartbeat of a pigeon held by Cordula Mora.
KINDERGARTNERS SENSE WONDER, EXCITEMENT OF SCIENCE IN PIGEON FLIGHT

Watching the homing pigeons in flight are (from left to right) Austin LeBoutillier, Yousef Ahmed, Isaac Orth, Noah Suckle and Dean Darwish.
On a breezy day late last month, an excited group of kindergartners from the Perrysburg Montessori School peered into the large pigeon loft at BGSU's Ecological Research Station while Dr. Cordula Mora told them a bit about the birds and their remarkable ability to find their way home no matter where they are.

Thanks to funding from the Division of Research and Economic Development, led by Dr. Michael Ogawa, the psychology department built the pigeon loft last year, which has enabled researchers with the J.P. Scott Center for Neuroscience, Mind and Behavior to work more closely with the homing pigeons and gather valuable data on their navigational ability.

"We're thankful to have this new facility, and it's great to be able to show kids that they could grow up to be scientists, too," Mora, a research assistant professor and National Science Foundation Fellow in the center, told teacher Jenni Miller.

"How did your parents know how to get here today?" she asked the students. "And if your parents left you here, would you know how to get back home?"

"No," they said.

"These birds can do that," Mora told them.

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FAMILY CAREGIVER SURVEY SEEKS INPUT

The Gerontology Program in the College of Health and Human Services is conducting research to investigate the past, current and projected informal caregiving patterns of BGSU faculty, staff and students.

The survey is anonymous and is intended for persons who provide unpaid, direct care to another person. Additional details of the survey can be found online. Instructions on the opening page explain the research and ensure viewers that the responses to the survey are voluntary and completely anonymous.

Questions may be directed to Dr. Nancy Orel, project investigator, at 419-372-7768.


IN BRIEF

Volunteers from BGSU and the community are still needed to help ensure the Falcon BEST Robotics Game Day on Oct. 26 is a success.

October 17, 2013